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I am using spring 3 mvc/security frameworks.

I have created a Controller class that has a reference to a repository to load data from. The class is annotated with @Controller, the repository class is annotated with @Repository, and the instance of the respository is @Autowired.

However when I try to unit test, the autowired instance throws a null pointer exception.

Now, I understand that because it is autowired, it needs to be within the spring context to be picked up. But I feel that if I use @RunsWith() then it becomes an integration test. I would really like to separate the integration tests (using @RunsWith) and the unit test for this method. Any ideas on how I can get around this null pointer exception? Would just creating getter/setter methods on my controller class be okay?:

Repository class:

@Repository
public class Repository{
 ....
}

Controller class:

@Controller
public class Controller{
@Autowired
private Repository repo;
....
public String showView(){
    repo.doSomething();
}

Test class:

public ControllerTest {
@Test
public shouldDoTestOfShowView(){
}
}
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so would creating the getter/setters in the controller be best practice? –  vikash dat Feb 9 '12 at 15:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I personally tend to use @Simon's approach, rather than exposing setters, although either approach is fine. Adding setters just for the sake of tests is a bit annoying, though.

An alternative is to use Spring's ReflectionTestUtils class to directly poke dependencies into the field using reflection, removing the need for special constructors and setters, e.g.

public ControllerTest {
   @Test
   public shouldDoTestOfShowView() {
      Controller controller = new Controller();
      Repository repository = new Repository();

      ReflectionTestUtils.setField(controller, "repo", repository); 
   }
}

Whether or not that still constitutes an "integration test" is your call (I don't).

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I think the reflectionTestUtils may be my best bet. But in my case, my repo has an autowired entityManager, so I will have to figure out how to do nested reflections. –  vikash dat Feb 9 '12 at 15:44
3  
If you are doing unit tests, you should mock the Repository. –  Simon LG Feb 9 '12 at 15:47

I always write 2 constructors. One without arguments for Spring and a protected one with all the dependencies for unit testing.

@Controller
public class Controller{
@Autowired
private Repository repo;

public Controller() {
    super();
}

protected Controller(Repositoy repo) {
    this();
    this.repo = repo;
}
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Why not just have a single constructor which is @Autowired? Instead of using field level Autowiring? –  Alex Feb 9 '12 at 15:36
1  
If you use XML configurations, you can use only 1 constructor with @Autowired on it. If you use Java based configurations, you have to instantiate the class in Java and having an empty constructor is handy. –  Simon LG Feb 9 '12 at 15:40

Normally, I would provide setters just for testing purposes, but if you are concerned about consumers of your code using them improperly, perhaps you want to use an approach that utilizes reflection.

I have written a utility in the past which takes in two arguments, a target object and an object you are setting on your target.

public static void set(Object target, Object setMeOnTarget) {
    //
}

What you can do from here is introspect on the fields of target, looking for Spring's supported autowiring annotations (@Autowired, @Resource, @Inject, maybe even @Value) and see if setMeOnTarget can be assigned to that field (I used Class.isAssignableFrom(Class)).

It may be a bit frail (Spring suddenly stops supporting these annotations...not likely...), but it has worked great for me.

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