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I have the next query:

SELECT EMP.NAME FROM EMPLOYEES EMP WHERE EMP.EMPLOYEE_ID IN (1, 2, 1, 1)
ORDER BY EMP.EMPLOYEE_ID; 

This last query returns 2 rows in an Ingres database (if EMPLOYEE_IDs 1 and 2 exist, that is). How would I have to modify this query in order to make it return 4 names, whether those IDs exist in the EMPLOYEES table or not (NULL or any other value), and including those EMPLOYEE_IDs that are repeated 2 or more times? I have seen many solutions for this kind of challenge but none of them apply to a SELECT IN clause.

What I ultimately want this query to help me with is in building a text file with multiple records, where an employee may appear in more than one record; can't afford to query each EMPLOYEE_ID because this query will have thousands of EMPLOYEE_IDs and database access is currently ephemeral, connection won't hold but a couple of minutes.

Hope I had explained myself well enough. -english is not my natural language. Greetings.

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1  
If your are using this data from an application, have the application handle these concerns, and let the query just worry about retrieving the qualifying data –  J Cooper Feb 9 '12 at 17:37
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1 Answer 1

It's better to apply the desired logic on client side, but if you want sql solution, you can use UNION ALL

SELECT * FROM 
(
SELECT EMP.NAME FROM EMPLOYEES EMP WHERE  EMP.EMPLOYEE_ID  = 1
UNION ALL 
SELECT EMP.NAME FROM EMPLOYEES EMP WHERE  EMP.EMPLOYEE_ID  = 2
UNION ALL 
SELECT EMP.NAME FROM EMPLOYEES EMP WHERE  EMP.EMPLOYEE_ID  = 1
UNION ALL 
SELECT EMP.NAME FROM EMPLOYEES EMP WHERE  EMP.EMPLOYEE_ID  = 1
)a 
ORDER BY EMPLOYEE_ID

You can also do

SELECT b.* 
FROM 
(SELECT 1 AS EMPLOYEE_ID -- FROM DUAL - if you use Oracle
 UNION ALL
 SELECT 2
 UNION ALL
 SELECT 1
 UNION ALL
 SELECT 1
)a
LEFT JOIN EMPLOYEES b ON (b.EMPLOYEE_ID = a.EMPLOYEE_ID)
ORDER BY a.EMPLOYEE_ID
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1  
Based on the "whether those IDs exist in the EMPLOYEES table or not", I think the right answer is your second alternative, but using a LEFT JOIN. Depending on the SQL dialect, the UNION ALL may be better written using VALUES, but not all databases support it, and I don't know Ingres. –  hvd Feb 9 '12 at 18:11
    
@hvd : Yeah, you're right, I missed it . thanks, fixing –  a1ex07 Feb 9 '12 at 18:16
    
thanks guys, I will try this out and come back after testing –  carlsLobato Feb 9 '12 at 18:55
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