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I'm creating a very simple example of Visitor use. I've got a class Aerial, which has two methods of creating an array, methodA and methodB. However, even before I define those methods, the compiler gives out some illogical errors: syntax error: identifier Aerial and "Visitor::VisitA : function does not take 1 arguments".

I've bundled the definition and declarations together to make the whole program simpler.

#include <iostream>
#include <conio.h>

#define MAX_SIZE 100

class Visitor
{
public:
     ~Visitor(){}
     void visitA(Aerial*){};
     void visitB(Aerial*){};
protected:
    Visitor(){}
};

class Aerial
{
private:
    double height, radius;
    double arr[MAX_SIZE];
protected:
    Aerial();
public:
    virtual ~Aerial(){};
    virtual void accept(Visitor&)=0;
};

class AerialA:public Aerial
{
public:
    void accept(Visitor &v)
    {
        v.visitA(this);
    }
};

class AerialB:public Aerial
{
public:
    void accept(Visitor &v)
    {
        v.visitB(this);
    }
};

int main()
{
    _getch();
    return 0;
}
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2 Answers 2

I guess you need to use forward declaration. Put

class Aerial; 

before declaration of class Visitor.

share|improve this answer
    
yeah that worked, stupid c++ :) thanks! –  Vidak Feb 9 '12 at 17:55
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You have to do a forward declaration of Aerial before your Visitor class:

class Aerial;

//rest of your code.

This because you're using Aerial in your Visitor class.

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yeah, thanks :) –  Vidak Feb 9 '12 at 17:57
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