Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to get WPF validation to work within the MVVM pattern.

In my View, I can validate a TextBox like this which gets handled by the code-behind method "HandleError", which works fine:

<TextBox Width="200"
         Validation.Error="HandleError">
    <TextBox.Text>
        <Binding Path="FirstName"
             NotifyOnValidationError="True"
             Mode="TwoWay">
            <Binding.ValidationRules>
                <validators:DataTypeLineIsValid/>
            </Binding.ValidationRules>
        </Binding>
    </TextBox.Text>
</TextBox>

However, I would like to handle the validation in my ViewModel via a DelegateCommand but when I try it with the following code, I get the explicit error "'{Binding HandleErrorCommand}' is not a valid event handler method name. Only instance methods on the generated or code-behind class are valid."

Are there any workaround for this so that we can handle validations within a MVVM pattern?

View:

<TextBox Width="200"
         Validation.Error="{Binding HandleErrorCommand}">
    <TextBox.Text>
        <Binding Path="FirstName"
             NotifyOnValidationError="True"
             Mode="TwoWay">
            <Binding.ValidationRules>
                <validators:DataTypeLineIsValid/>
            </Binding.ValidationRules>
        </Binding>
    </TextBox.Text>
</TextBox>

ViewModel:

#region DelegateCommand: HandleError
private DelegateCommand handleErrorCommand;

public ICommand HandleErrorCommand
{
    get
    {
        if (handleErrorCommand == null)
        {
            handleErrorCommand = new DelegateCommand(HandleError, CanHandleError);
        }
        return handleErrorCommand;
    }
}

private void HandleError()
{
    MessageBox.Show("in view model");
}

private bool CanHandleError()
{
    return true;
}
#endregion
share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I don't know if this will help you, but I'll offer it all the same.

Also, I'm using Silverlight, not WPF.

I don't specify any validation in my Views, neither in the code behind nor the xaml. My View has only data bindings to properties on the ViewModel.

All my error checking/validation is handled by the ViewModel. When I encounter an error, I set a ErrorMessage property, which is bound to the view as well. The ErrorMessage textblock (in the view) has a value converter which hides it if the error is null or empty.

Doing things this way makes it easy to unit test input validation.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice to know, this was the direction I was going to take since validation in WPF currently doesn't seem as straight-forward or feature-full as I thought it would be. –  Edward Tanguay May 29 '09 at 7:54
add comment

Here's a way to do this using Expression Blend 3 behaviors. I wrote a ValidationErrorEventTrigger because the built-in EventTrigger doesn't work with attached events.

View:

<TextBox>
<i:Interaction.Triggers>
	<MVVMBehaviors:ValidationErrorEventTrigger>
		<MVVMBehaviors:ExecuteCommandAction TargetCommand="HandleErrorCommand" />
	</MVVMBehaviors:ValidationErrorEventTrigger>
</i:Interaction.Triggers>
<TextBox.Text>
    <Binding Path="FirstName"
             Mode="TwoWay"
             NotifyOnValidationError="True">
        <Binding.ValidationRules>
            <ExceptionValidationRule />
        </Binding.ValidationRules>
    </Binding>
</TextBox.Text>

ViewModel: (could be unchanged, but here's a look at how I dug into the validation arguments to find the error message when using the exception validation rule)

    public ICommand HandleErrorCommand
    {
        get
        {
            if (_handleErrorCommand == null)
                _handleErrorCommand = new RelayCommand<object>(param => OnDisplayError(param));
            return _handleErrorCommand;
        }
    }

    private void OnDisplayError(object param)
    {
        string message = "Error!";
        var errorArgs = param as ValidationErrorEventArgs;
        if (errorArgs != null)
        {
            var exception = errorArgs.Error.Exception;
            while (exception != null)
            {
                message = exception.Message;
                exception = exception.InnerException;
            }
        }
        Status = message;
    }

ValidationErrorEventTrigger:

public class ValidationErrorEventTrigger : EventTriggerBase<DependencyObject>
{
    protected override void OnAttached()
    {
        Behavior behavior = base.AssociatedObject as Behavior;
        FrameworkElement associatedElement = base.AssociatedObject as FrameworkElement;

        if (behavior != null)
        {
            associatedElement = ((IAttachedObject)behavior).AssociatedObject as FrameworkElement;
        }
        if (associatedElement == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Validation Error Event trigger can only be associated to framework elements");
        }
        associatedElement.AddHandler(Validation.ErrorEvent, new RoutedEventHandler(this.OnValidationError));
    }
    void OnValidationError(object sender, RoutedEventArgs args)
    {
        base.OnEvent(args);
    }
    protected override string GetEventName()
    {
        return Validation.ErrorEvent.Name;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it worked very well! I only had to change a little the XAML to register the event with MVVM Light: <i:Interaction.Triggers> <MVVMBehaviors:ValidationErrorEventTrigger> <cmd:EventToCommand Command="{Binding ValidationErrorCommand}" PassEventArgsToCommand="True" /> </MVVMBehaviors:ValidationErrorEventTrigger> </i:Interaction.Triggers> –  Vicente Hernández Jun 10 '13 at 16:11
add comment

Events are tricky with MVVM, but not impossible. The typical method is to use an attached behavior to handle this. Caliburn has a usable solution for this in the Message.Attach behavior.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I gave up on the built-in error validation and opted for a just exposing an error property in my ViewModel.

Here's an example of simple error validation in WPF MVVM, similar to Matt Brunell's answer. You can download a simple project using this technique at the link above

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.