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I have three enums, which - in combination - should identify a unique state of affairs.

A struct of Enums, some bit fields, others not

enum KeyCode
{
    A,
    B,
    C,
    D,
    E
}

[Flags]
enum KeyModifiers
{
    Empty = 0,
    NoModifiers = 10000,
    Shift = 20000,
    Control = 40000,
    Alt = 80000
}

enum KeyState
{
    Empty = 0,
    Down = 10000000,
    Up = 20000000
}

I would like to implement a class which encompasses that state, and which would provide a Contains method, which would allow me to somehow treat the combination of these enums as a single value supporting bitwise operations.

But the current implementation does not work, I believe because some of the underlying enums are not bit fields.

Contains does not work due to KeyCode

class KeyEvent
{

    public KeyEvent(KeyCode key, KeyState down = KeyState.Empty, KeyModifiers modifiers = KeyModifiers.Empty)
    {
        Key = key;
        State = down;
        Modifiers = modifiers;
    }

    public int Id
    {
        get
        {
            return (int)Key + (int)State + (int)Modifiers;
        }
    }

    public KeyCode Key { get; set; }

    public KeyState State { get; set; }

    public KeyModifiers Modifiers { get; set; }

    public bool Contains(KeyEvent comparable)
    {
        return (Id & comparable.Id) == comparable.Id;
    }

}

How could I achieve my aim, which is to be able to compare the current values of those enums (this KeyEvent) with an input set of those enum values (as another KeyEvent) so as to determine whether the input values are contained within the current instance (but not necessarily equal to it) ?

  • I could simply compare the enums separately, but is there a better solution?
  • I do not want to create a fourth enum that combines all the other three in a bitwise manner, as KeyData does for KeyCode and modifiers
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You would have to either define KeyCode like this

[Flags]
enum KeyCode {
    A = 1,
    B = 2,
    C = 4,
    D = 8,
    E = 16
} 

Or to calculate the combined value with

return (int)Math.Pow(2, (int)Key) + (int)State + (int)Modifiers;
share|improve this answer
    
I copy-pasted 2^(int)Key which is a very neat solution, but it didnt work, probably because you meant (int)Math.Pow(2, (int)Key) + (int)State + (int)Modifiers; Unfortunately, that does not work either in my case, because in actual fact i have more than 200 values in KeyCode and not even ulong or decimal has a large enough maximum to accommodate such powers - so i will have to use individual enum comparisons (which is not bad in itself). thanks! –  Cel Feb 9 '12 at 18:21
    
Indeed, I meant the power. ^ is XOR, :-(. And of cause you need one bit per enum value. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Feb 9 '12 at 18:29

Your KeyCode isn't a bit-wise field, so using bit-wise logic on it does not make sense. However you can easily take out KeyCode and do the rest of the comparison as you have shown.

public int StateModifiers { get { return (int)State + (int)Modifiers; } }

public bool Contains(KeyEvent comparable)
{
    return Key == comparable.Key && ((StateModifiers & comparable.StateModifiers) == comparable.StateModifiers);
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, thats what im kind of doing now, but using the HasFlag extension method available in .NET 4 –  Cel Feb 9 '12 at 18:40

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