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I am new to Nhibernate and slowing working my way thru learning it. I tried to implement a session manager class to help me get the session for my db calls. Below is the code for it. Can someone please say if this is architecturally correct and foresee any issue of scalability or performance?

public static class StaticSessionManager
{
    private static ISession _session;

    public static ISession GetCurrentSession()
    {
        if (_session == null)
            OpenSession();

        return _session;
    }

    private static void OpenSession()
    {
        _session = (new Configuration()).Configure().BuildSessionFactory().OpenSession();
    }
    public static void CloseSession()
    {
        if (_session != null)
        {
            _session.Close();
            _session = null;
        }
    }
}

and in my data provider class, I use the following code to get data.

    public class GenericDataProvider<T>
    {
            NHibernate.ISession _session;

            public GenericDataProvider()
            {
                this._session = StaticSessionManager.GetCurrentSession();
            }

            public T GetById(object id)
            {
                using (ITransaction tx = _session.BeginTransaction())
                {
                    try
                    {
                        T obj = _session.Get<T>(id);
                        tx.Commit();
                        return obj;
                    }
                    catch (Exception ex)
                    {
                        tx.Rollback();
                        StaticSessionManager.CloseSession();
                        throw ex;
                    }
                }
            }
    }

and then

public class UserDataProvider : GenericDataProvider<User>
{
    public User GetUserById(Guid uid)
    {
        return GetById(uid)

    }
}

Final usage in Page

UserDataProvider  udp = new UserDataProvider();
User u = udp.GetUserById(xxxxxx-xxx-xxx);

Is this something that is correct? Will instantiating lot of data providers in a single page cause issues?

I am also facing an issue right now, where if I do a same read operation from multiple machines at the same time, Nhibernate throws random errors- which I think is due to transactions.

Please advice.

share|improve this question
    
Don't use throw ex; like that. In order to properly rethrow an exception use throw;. Executing throw ex; causes the exception's original stack trace to be discarded and then (less importantly) incurs an additional performance hit to generate a new stack trace starting from that line of code. The frustrating part of it is that you will not be able to tell where the original exception was thrown from, because you lost the original stack trace. –  Dr. Wily's Apprentice Feb 9 '12 at 19:28

1 Answer 1

From what I can see you are building the session factory if you have a null session. You should only call BuildSessionFactory() once when the application starts.

Where you do this is up to you, some people build the SessionFactory inside Global.asax in the method application_start or in your case have a static property for sessionFactory instead of session in your StaticSessionManager class.

I suspect your errors are due to the fact that your session factory is being built multiple times!

Another point is that some people open a transaction _session.BeginTransaction() at the beginning of each request and either commit or rollback at the end of each request. This gives you a unit of work which means you can lose the

using (ITransaction tx = _session.BeginTransaction())  
{
 ...
}

on every method. All of this is open for debate but I use this method for 99% of all my code with no trouble at all.

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