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I've created a watchdog timer (using a System.Windows.Forms.Timer), which triggers if a long period of time expires without receiving a small packet of data:

using System.Windows.Forms;
public class Watchdog
{
    private Timer Timer;

    public void Go()
    {
        Timer.Start();
    }

    public void Reset()
    {
        Timer.Stop();
        Timer.Start();
    }

    private void OnTimerExpired(object State)
    {
        Timer.Stop();
        DoSomething();
    }

    public Watchdog()
    {
        Timer = new Timer();
        Timer.Tick += new EventHandler(OnTimerExpired);
        Timer.Interval = (1000 * Timeout);            
    }
}

The main code calls Go(), and then calls Reset() each time a packet is received. If the timer expires, OnTimerExpired() is called.

Since that there may be hundreds of packet receptions per second, and since the main job of the application is to respond to such packets, I'm beginning to wonder if resetting the timer isn't too CPU/OS intensive.

Any idea how calling Timer.Stop()/Timer.Start() this way may impact performance (in terms of latency)?

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Would you be possibly better off use the System.Debug.Stopwatch class? –  MattC Feb 9 '12 at 18:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use a simple timespan or integer variable as a flag. When the timer ticks, it checks against a Stopwatch object to see how much time has elapsed since the flag was last udpated. If it's longer than your timeout value you trigger your watchdog code.

Now, instead of resetting your timer, other code can just use the stopwatch to update your timespan flag value when a new packet comes in.

You should also either set your timer's tick interval to about 1/2 of what you want the actual timeout duration to be, or have code in the event to set your interval so your next tick event is just a few milliseconds after you would timeout if the connection was severed now. Otherwise you could end up waiting almost twice as long as the timeout duration in the situation where your last packet arrived very soon after a tick event.

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Beat me to it :-) –  Chris Shain Feb 9 '12 at 18:48
1  
Do not use DateTime for this! You will run into problems during Daylight Saving time transitions, as well as if the user changes the clock. You're better off starting a Stopwatch when the program starts, and saving its Elapsed value every time a message comes in. The timer tick can then compare the current Elapsed value with the last message received value. –  Jim Mischel Feb 9 '12 at 18:50
    
Good point about daylight savings –  Joel Coehoorn Feb 9 '12 at 18:50

Another option, by the way, is to just have a Boolean flag that's set whenever a message comes in. The timer event handler checks that flag and alerts if it's not set. So you have:

private bool GotAMessage = false;

void MessageReceived()
{
    // happens whenever a message is received
    GotAMessage = true;
}

void OnTimerExpired(object state)
{
    if (!GotAMessage)
    {
        // didn't receive a message in time.
    }
    GotAMessage = false;
}
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A simpler option is to call a method on the WatchDog class that updates a common lastPacketReceived value time a packet is received. Then you only need to start a single timer one time in the WatchDog class that ticks once per timeout interval and compares the current time to the lastPacketReceived value:

public static class WatchDog
{
    static object locker = new object();
    static long lastPacketReceived;
    static Stopwatch stopWatch = new Stopwatch();
    static long threshold = 5000;
    static WatchDog()
    {
        Timer watchDogTimer = new Timer(1000);
        watchDogTimer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(watchDogTimer_Elapsed);
        watchDogTimer.Start();
        stopWatch.Start();
    }

    static void watchDogTimer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        lock (locker)
        {
            if ((stopWatch.ElapsedMilliseconds - lastPacketReceived) > threshold)
            {
                // threshold exceeded
            }
        }
    }

    public static void PacketReceived()
    {
        lock (locker)
        {
            lastPacketReceived = stopWatch.ElapsedMilliseconds;
        }
    }
}
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Any idea how calling Timer.Stop()/Timer.Start() this way may impact performance (in terms of latency)?

None

The amount of resources required to do this is unlikely to be measured. Unless you have a performance problem, don't try to solve a performance problem, at the very least use software to profile the software to see if its an actual problem.

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