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I'm trying to validate input in ksh, and would like to know the easiest way to determine if a string is a valid number.

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up vote 7 down vote accepted

Have a go with :

    case $INPUT in
        +([0-9])*(.)*([0-9]) )
              # Variable is numeric
              ;;
        *) 
              # Nope, not numeric
              ;;

esac
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+1 for ksh wildcards +(..), *(...) ! – shellter Feb 9 '12 at 19:27
    
Does ksh put wildcards before instead of after, as in a "regular" regular expression? – Steve Feb 9 '12 at 19:52
3  
This solution seems to consider 123...99 as numeric – Ruchi Feb 9 '12 at 19:58
1  
then just use the ? operator that matches 0 or 1 repetitions of the re like this +([0-9])?(.)*([0-9]) – ramrunner Mar 26 '14 at 21:51

This fixes FreudianSlip's answer to include optional, leading "-" or "+" sign, allow decimal numbers that begin with "." (no leading 0), and exclude numbers containing multiple "." (e.g. "12...34"):

case $INPUT in
    {,1}([-+])+([0-9]){,1}(.)*([0-9])|{,1}([-+]).+([0-9]))
          # Variable is numeric
          ;;
    *) 
          # Nope, not numeric
          ;;

esac
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[ $input -ge 0 -o $input-lt 0 ] 2>/dev/null && echo "numeric"

This will check if the input is numeric (positive or negative integer) and print numeric if it is.

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Simpler, if you just want to know if the string is composed of digits:

case $INPUT in
    [0-9][0-9]* )
          # Variable contains only digits
          ;;
    *) 
          # Variable contains at least one non-digit
          ;;
esac
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