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I have a 5 x 5 matrix M and two vectors

x=[1:5]
y=[1 4 3 5 2]

I would like to extract the elements of M with subscripts (x,y), i.e. (1,1),(2,4),(3,3),(4,5),(5,2). Of course, I could do something like

M(sub2ind([5,5],x,y))

But there is some overhead associated with the conversion to indices. Is there another way to do the same?

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1  
Does simply doing M(x,y) not work? –  hatboyzero Feb 9 '12 at 19:02
    
diag(M(x,y)) should work, but I'm not sure how efficient it is –  groovingandi Feb 9 '12 at 19:15
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4 Answers

Not an answer. But since I was interested I run tests of my own.

M = magic(5)
x=[1:5];
y=[1 4 3 5 2];

%%
tic
for i=1:10000
    out = M(sub2ind([5,5],x,y));
end
toc % Elapsed time is 0.413526 seconds.
out
%%
tic
for i=1:10000
    out = M(x+(y-1)*5);
end
toc % Elapsed time is 0.024004 seconds.
out
%%
fun = @(x,y)(M(x,y)); 
tic
for i=1:10000
    out = arrayfun(fun,x,y);
end
toc % Elapsed time is 0.449727 seconds.
out
%%
fun = @(x,y)(M(x,y)); 
tic
for i=1:10000
    out = nan(1,5);
    for j=1:5
        out(j) = M(x(j),y(j));
    end
end
toc % Elapsed time is  0.045242 seconds.
out

(sorry had a stupid copy-paste error in the first program)

I didn't expext the for loop to come out second.

I'm on 2011b - so seems it improved a lot.

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on those times.. BARF –  user417896 Jul 18 '13 at 1:35
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You could do this using anonymous function handles in combination with the arrayfun method:

% declare an anonymous function which operates on M with args x and y
fun = @(x,y)(M(x,y)); 
% Ask arrayfun to execute "fun" for each pair of x and y.
arrayfun(fun, x, y); 
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+1 - Creative. But there should be some overhead like the initial approach, or even more. –  Andrey Feb 10 '12 at 8:32
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MATLAB uses Column Major format, why not exploit that? M is 5x5 So, The first column is M(1), M(2), M(3), M(4), M(5). So, Generalizing this:

M(x,y) = M((x+(y-1)*5)

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I think sub2ind might be a bit faster. –  Ivan Feb 9 '12 at 19:16
    
Nopes. I tested it repeatedly. >> a = rand(5000,5000); >> x = 1:5000; >> y = randperm(5000); >> tic;p2=a(x+(y-1)*5000);toc; Elapsed time is 0.000732 seconds. >> tic;p=a(sub2ind([5000,5000],x,y));toc; Elapsed time is 0.001371 seconds. –  user1132648 Feb 9 '12 at 19:22
2  
sub2ind does basically the same, the overhead just associated with error checking, generalization etc. Look at sub2ind.m. –  yuk Feb 9 '12 at 19:52
1  
I know but why use unnecessary overheads when you know what you are doing? –  user1132648 Feb 10 '12 at 14:01
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I think your sub2ind approach is the fastest.

If you think about readability - maybe read in a for loop.

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Do you mean code readability? I though for loops are a big no-no in matlab array operations since they have massive overhead? –  Ivan Feb 9 '12 at 19:17
    
They perform very poorly. But for debugging they are easier to read than most of these vectorized constructs. –  bdecaf Feb 9 '12 at 19:21
    
Also for is a standard construct used in many languages. It's just a shame that they still haven't fixed this in matlab - but it gets better with every version. –  bdecaf Feb 9 '12 at 19:25
2  
It's a myth that for loops in MATLAB have "massive overhead", this used to be true at some point, like say, 8 years ago. With the introduction of JIT'd code and other optimizations, vectorization is no longer as important as it used to be, and can even be detrimental in some cases. –  eternaln00b Feb 10 '12 at 4:10
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