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I created a List called people that holds an identification number, name, title, and city. I would like to automate the reading out of this list using a foreach but am a little stuck on the syntax. Can someone shed a little light on it. Below is my code.

List<Person> people = new List<Person>();

Person p1 = new Person(74, "Brad","Millington","Program Manager", "Milford");
Person p2 = new Person(58, "John", "Kaufman", "Author", "Ottawa");
Person p3 = new Person(68, "-*", "Washington" , "Developer", "Redmond");
Person p4 = new Person(79, "Abraham", "Licoln", "Developer", "Redmond");

foreach (string s in people)
{
    people.Add(s);
}
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closed as not a real question by Tigraine, leppie, Edward Thomson, dtb, bmargulies Feb 10 '12 at 1:22

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
You need to supply us with the format of that list as you are apparently only scanning a list/array of strings –  Tigraine Feb 9 '12 at 19:05
    
Your List is empty, you created 4 Persons but never added them to the list –  msmucker0527 Feb 9 '12 at 19:06
2  
-1 please revise the question and the code, it makes no sense. –  Myles McDonnell Feb 9 '12 at 19:06
    
What are you trying to read? In your example, there's nothing in the list, but you're trying to add strings to it. Which doesn't work, since it's not a list of strings. And I should have refreshed before commenting. –  Mr Lister Feb 9 '12 at 19:08

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

your people list is currently empty at the beginning

You would want to add your p1, p2, p3 and p4 to the people list

Person p1 = new Person(74, 'Brad', 'Millington', 'Program Manager', 'Milford');
people.add(p1);

Then in your for each if you are printing them out i assume you have a getter for the name

foreach (Person p in people) 
{
    Console.Write(p.getFirstName() + ' ' + p.getLastName());
}

I have not done any C# myself but this should work based on my experience with Java

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print doesn't exist in C#. Use Console.Write instead. Also, Properties aren't called like methods. Other than that, this is correct. –  Kyle Trauberman Feb 9 '12 at 19:10
    
+1 for getting it right without knowing any C#. –  Mr Lister Feb 9 '12 at 19:10
    
@KyleTrauberman Yes, but you can easily create a function print that does what you want. –  Mr Lister Feb 9 '12 at 19:11
    
That's very true. –  Kyle Trauberman Feb 9 '12 at 19:12
    
Just as an additional note on idiom, to underscore @KyleTrauberman's point: The first and last names would more likely be expressed as properties, so Console.Write(p.FirstName + ' ' + p.LastName); –  phoog Feb 10 '12 at 0:18

It sounds like you want to populate a list then read out its values in a foreach loop. If that's what you want to do, then the core of the question is: "what is a string representation of my object?"

For example, if you were calling p.ToString() where p is a Person, by default you would get its type name. When creating objects, it is sometimes useful to override the ToString() method of the implied base class for Person, i.e. System.Object. Beware that when you do override the ToString() method, the compiler will warn you if you don't also override GetHashCode() and Equals().

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You can use list Initializer:

var people = new List<Person>{
    new Person(74, "Brad","Millington","Program Manager", "Milford"),
    new Person(58, "John", "Kaufman", "Author", "Ottawa"),
    new Person(68, "-*", "Washington" , "Developer", "Redmond"),
    new Person(79, "Abraham", "Licoln", "Developer", "Redmond")
};
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As an addition to the other correct answers, I note that a nicer way to create your test data is to use a collection initializer:

List<Person> people = new List<Person>() 
{
    new Person(74, "Brad","Millington","Program Manager", "Milford"),
    new Person(58, "John", "Kaufman", "Author", "Ottawa"),
    new Person(68, "-*", "Washington" , "Developer", "Redmond"),
    new Person(79, "Abraham", "Licoln", "Developer", "Redmond")
};

foreach (Person person in people)
{
    Console.WriteLine(person.Name);
}
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Okay, there are a few things wrong with your code:

  1. people is a list of Person objects, so iterating over it as a list of strings will give you a compile error.

  2. You can not modify the collection that is being iterated over when using foreach. You are doing this by using .Add() inside the loop.

  3. people is empty, so the loop won't execute anyways.

This code will compile, and write the first and last name of each person the the console:

List<Person> people = new List<Person>();

Person p1 = new Person(74, "Brad","Millington","Program Manager", "Milford");
Person p2 = new Person(58, "John", "Kaufman", "Author", "Ottawa");
Person p3 = new Person(68, "-*", "Washington" , "Developer", "Redmond");
Person p4 = new Person(79, "Abraham", "Licoln", "Developer", "Redmond");

people.Add(p1);
people.Add(p2);
people.Add(p3);
people.Add(p4);

foreach (Person p in people)
{
    Console.WriteLine(p.FirstName + " " + p.LastName);
}
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The foreach statement is used to loop through an enumerable which has data, not to fill the collection in the first place. You can't loop through something with no items - in your case, you're trying to do a "for each "s" in people" but people is empty because you haven't added anything to it yet.

If you're trying to add the 4 people to your list, you need to just add them directly:

List<Person> people = new List<Person>();

people.Add(new Person(74, "Brad","Millington","Program Manager", "Milford"));
people.Add(new Person(58, "John", "Kaufman", "Author", "Ottawa"));
people.Add(new Person(68, "-*", "Washington" , "Developer", "Redmond"));
people.Add(new Person(79, "Abraham", "Licoln", "Developer", "Redmond"));

(Note that you can also use collection initialization syntax if you prefer...)

Once the people are added, you can then loop over them, and print out as needed:

foreach(Person person in people)
    Console.WriteLine(person.FirstName + " " + person.LastName);

Note that, at this point, the loop will loop and give you a Person instance each iteration, not a string. In order to have the foreach as you wrote, you'd have to have an implicit conversion to string (which I wouldn't recommend) for the Person class.

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