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Given a Queue<MyMessage>, where MyMessage is the base class for some types of messages: all message types have different fields, so they will use a different amount of bytes. Therefore it would make sense to measure the fill level of this queue in terms of bytes rather than of elements present in the queue. In fact, since this queue is associated with a connection, I could better control the message flow, reducing the traffic if the queue is nearly full.

In order to get this target, I thought to wrap a simple Queue with a custom class MyQueue.

public class MyQueue
{
    private Queue<MyMessage> _outputQueue;
    private Int32 _byteCapacity;
    private Int32 _currentSize;   // number of used bytes

    public MyQueue(int byteCapacity)
    {
        this._outputQueue = new Queue<MyMessage>();
        this._byteCapacity = byteCapacity;
        this._currentSize = 0;
    }

    public void Enqueue(MyMessage msg)
    {
        this._outputQueue.Enqueue(msg);
        this._currentSize += Marshal.SizeOf(msg.GetType());
    }

    public MyMessage Dequeue()
    {
        MyMessage result = this._outputQueue.Dequeue();
        this._currentSize -= Marshal.SizeOf(result.GetType());
        return result;
    }
}

The problem is that this is not good for classes, because Marshal.SizeOf throws an ArgumentException exception.

  1. Is it possible to calculate in some way the size of an object (instance of a class)?
  2. Are there some alternatives to monitor the fill level of a queue in terms of bytes?
  3. Are there any queues that can be managed in this way?

UPDATE: As an alternative solution I could add a method int SizeBytes() on each message type, but this solution seems a little ugly, although it would perhaps be the most efficient since You cannot easily measure a reference type.

public interface MyMessage
{
    Guid Identifier
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    int SizeBytes();
}

The classes that implement this interface must, in addition to implementing the SizeBytes() method, also implement an Identifier property.

public class ExampleMessage
{
    public Guid Identifier { get; set; }   // so I have a field and its Identifier property
    public String Request { get; set; }

    public int SizeBytes()
    {
        return (Marshal.SizeOf(Identifier));   // return 16
    }
}

The sizeof operator can not be used with Guid because it does not have a predefined size, so I use Marshal.SizeOf(). But at this point perhaps I should use the experimentally determined values​​: for example, since Marshal.SizeOf() returns 16 for a Guid and since a string consists of N char, then the SizeBytes() method could be as following:

public int SizeBytes()
{
   return (16 + Request.Length * sizeof(char));
}
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2  
You cannot easily measure a reference type. –  SLaks Feb 9 '12 at 19:15
    
What happens if you use Marshal.SizeOf(msg) instead of msg.GetType()? –  Joe Feb 9 '12 at 19:15
    
@Joe: it throws an ArgumentException. –  enzom83 Feb 9 '12 at 19:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you could edit the MyMessage base class with a virtual method SizeOf(), then you could have the message classes use the c# sizeof operator on its primitive types. If you can do that, the rest of your code is gold.

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I think it's the only efficient alternative. Using a virtual method SizeOf, the subclasses must be implement it! –  enzom83 Feb 9 '12 at 20:10
    
Yeah, it's a bit more work, and you might need to tack on a few bytes for the pointers if you're using sizeof, but it should work. Let me know if it does! –  Nick Vaccaro Feb 9 '12 at 20:37
    
It works! I updated the thread. –  enzom83 Feb 10 '12 at 0:42
    
@enzom83 Great to hear. Kindly accept answer. –  Nick Vaccaro Feb 10 '12 at 16:20

You can get an indication of the size of your objects by measuring the length of their binary serialization. Note that this figure will typically be higher than you expect, since .NET may also include metadata in the serialized representation. This approach would also require all your classes to be marked with the [Serializable] attribute.

public static long GetSerializedSize(object root)
{
    using (var memoryStream = new MemoryStream())
    {
        var binaryFormatter = new BinaryFormatter();
        binaryFormatter.Serialize(memoryStream, root);
        return memoryStream.Length;
    }
}
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