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I have a subrouting that outputs a list of FQDN's, separated by new lines:

x1.server.com
s2.sys.com
5a.fdsf.com

^^ It's in this format, so there's no pattern other than {variable text}.{variable text}.{variable text}

My question is how would I be able to get THIS output as the input of a foreach statement so that I can iterate through each FQDN?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

NB: You say the sub outputs a list, but I assume what you mean is that it outputs a string. Otherwise, this question is moot.

Just split the output on newline. Assuming the subroutine is called subname:

for my $fqdn (split /\n/, subname())

As Brian Roach notes in the comments, the optimal solution is to make the subroutine return a list instead of a string. However, that may not be a viable solution for you. Either way, if you wish to try it, simply add the split at the appropriate place in the subroutine instead. E.g.:

sub foo {
    ...
    #return $string;
    return split /\n/, string;
}

If you want to get advanced, you may make use of the wantarray function, which detects in which context the subroutine is called:

sub foo {
    ...
    return $string unless wantarray;
    return split /\n/, string;
}

While this is very cute, it can lead to unwanted behaviour unless you know what you are doing.

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3  
+1 Or ... change the subroutine to actually return an array rather than a string. –  Brian Roach Feb 9 '12 at 19:38
1  
@BrianRoach That would be optimal for this case, but it may be that he cannot alter the subroutine due to it being used elsewhere. –  TLP Feb 9 '12 at 19:41
1  
@TLP - thanks for this, I'll accept your answer. @Brian Roach: I ended up actually taking your advice. I added push @results,$domain and then return @results into their respected parts of the subroutine and then called the foreach loop like foreach $host (get_mirror_list()) { and it worked beautifully. I'm not an expert at perl so any expert advice I can get I try to implement that was rather than the easy way, although, it did seem easier to do it this way. Thanks! –  drewrockshard Feb 9 '12 at 19:59
    
If you want to preserve trailing blank lines, you'll need split /^/m, $_, -1 instead of split /\n/, $_. –  ikegami Feb 9 '12 at 21:42
my $data = mySubRoutine()
# Data now contains one FQDN per line

foreach (my $line = split(/\n/,$data))
{
     doStuffWith($line);
}
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I wonder if you really mean that your subroutine "outputs" a list - i.e. that it prints the list to STDOUT. Do you have something like this?

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

sub print_list_of_fqdns {
  say "x1.server.com\ns2.sys.com\n5a.fdsf.com";
}

print_list_of_fqdns();

If that's the case then you need to be a bit clever and re-open STDOUT onto a variable.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

sub print_list_of_fqdns {
  say "x1.server.com\ns2.sys.com\n5a.fdsf.com";
}

sub get_list_of_fqdns {
  # Declare a buffer
  my $string;

  # Open a filehandle that writes to the buffer
  open my $fh, '>', \$string or die $!;

  # Set your new filehandle to the default output filehandle
  # (taking a copy of the original one)
  my $old_fh = select $fh;

  # Call the function. This will now write the list to the
  # variable $string instead of STDOUT
  print_list_of_fqdns();

  # Split $string to get the individual FQDNs
  my @fqdns = split /\n/, $string;

  # Replace the old default output filehandle
  select $old_fh;

  # Return the list of FQDNs
  return @fqdns;
}

say join ' / ', get_list_of_fqdns();
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