Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have an unordered list as a navbar for my site. It looks great in Safari, Chrome, and Opera on my Mac. However, in Windows IE and Firefox (either platform), it takes the items that should all be in one line and pushes 1 or 2 of them down to a second line. Any ideas on how to help this? Perhaps it is font sizes used in IE or firefox as opposed to Safari and Opera?

Here is the HTML:

<ul id="navbar">
<li class="home"><a href="index.html">Home</a></li>
<li class="pictures"><a href="pics.html">Pictures</a></li>
<li class="bio"><a href="bio.html">Biography</a></li>
<li class="media"><a href="media.html">Media</a></li>
<li class="performances"><a href="performances.html">Performances</a></li></ul>

The CSS:

#navbar
{
width: 600px;
margin-left: auto;
margin-right: auto;
padding:0px;
height:20px

}
#navbar li {
width: 120px;
list-style:none;
display:inline;
text-align: center;
}
#navbar a
{
width: 120px;
float: left;
}
share|improve this question
1  
You've already answered your own question. When content is too wide, it will wrap. Define a font/size, use a smaller font size, and/or adjust the width of your elements. –  Sparky Feb 9 '12 at 19:59
    
What's your Firefox version? I tried on 10.0 and worked. Try setting the font-size or resetting some values. –  Karlisson Feb 9 '12 at 19:59
    
Dan Cederholm just posted this recently. If you're looking to do a horizontal list of links or buttons, check out his new design pattern site: pea.rs. Particularly pea.rs/navigation/horizontal-links or pea.rs/navigation/horizontal-buttons. It looks like you might be trying to do something similar. I would recommend floating the LI's so you can apply things like margin/padding/width more effectively. –  jmbertucci Feb 9 '12 at 20:14
    
Fozzyuw, I am currently trying the navbar stuff from pea.rs that you recommended. Just figuring out the methods for indicating the active link on the current page, etc. Looks like it is working so far. Once I get it active, I'll post again. –  Matthew Smith Feb 10 '12 at 3:46
    
Well, I put the pea.rs stuff into my site, and I like the navbar better. My only issue was that I couldn't get the navbar to center onto the page except by setting the margin-left (to 25%), which is as close as I could get to centering it. Here's a link to my page, if you want to see. It's a very simple page - I'm a musician that is doing his own website. matthewloyal.com –  Matthew Smith Feb 10 '12 at 15:02

2 Answers 2

You forgot the display: block; and the list-style: none for the <ul> tag!

Try using this:

#navbar
{
width: 600px;
float: left;
list-style: none;
padding:0px;
height:20px
}

It should work. I use this for my CSS menu on my CMS...

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Frederick. I took Fozzy's advice and changed my navbar up a bit, going with the horizontal links from pea.rs - which looks good. If you want to see what I did, my site is simple: matthewloyal.com and you can see my lame attempt at making my own site using css snippets from all around the web... –  Matthew Smith Feb 10 '12 at 15:04

You could try use the li as block elements and float them:

#navbar li {
width: 120px;
display: block;
float:left;
text-align: center;
}

Edit: elcanrs correctly pointed out that a floated elements turns into a block element automatically, thus the display: block; in my code sample only serves to illustrate.

From http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS2/visuren.html#float-position:

The element generates a block box that is floated to the left. Content flows on the right side of the box, starting at the top (subject to the 'clear' property).

share|improve this answer
2  
display: block is implied when you float and element. –  elclanrs Feb 9 '12 at 20:02
    
hmmm... all this time I never realized float forces block level. That makes sense though. –  jmbertucci Feb 9 '12 at 20:22
    
@elclanrs This is absolutely wrong. Display:block is not necessarily implied when floating an element. #navbar li{} could contain display:inline which would make the LI elements inline, and still be floated. By default, yes, LI's are block level elements, but they don't assume display:block property when being floated. –  Downpour046 Feb 9 '12 at 21:03
    
When you float an inline element, ie <span><strong><small> etc it'll become display: block... –  elclanrs Feb 9 '12 at 21:16
    
I edited my post to reflect your input - didn't know that myself, but nonetheless it also illustrated the implied behaviour by explicitly setting display to block. –  kontur Feb 10 '12 at 13:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.