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I have 3 values which all get rounded to no decimal places (ie 5%, 25%, 70%) except my 70% is really 70.6% so it goes to 71% which makes my total 5%, 25%, 71% = 101% which is not good, especially because i have a bar graph that if it goes over 100% width, gets really messed up.

How can i make sure that my 3 values never equal more than 100%? right now im using Math.Round(value,0) are there any switches/options i can use to keep my total of my 3 values from being over 100%?

Thanks

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7  
Post. Your. Code. –  Oded Feb 9 '12 at 20:53
    
Well, why don't you write the sum into a variable and check that it does not exceed the specified limit? Alternatively, you could force the values to be rounded to the biggest integer smaller than the actual value... –  Abrixas2 Feb 9 '12 at 20:54

8 Answers 8

If the three values always have to sum up to 100 then round only two of the values and calculate the third one with

third = 100 - Math.Round(a) - Math.Round(b);

Note: Your result could also be too small. If you have three values being 33.333333, rounding and adding them will yield 99!


EDIT (in response to @BlueRajaDannyPflughoeft's comment)

If you have many values, the sum of all the rounding errors might become large. Therefore, it would not be a good idea to shift it to the last value. For these cases, I suggest a continuous rounding.

double[] values = new double[] { 17.2, 3.7, 4.6, 5.8 };
int[] percent = new int[values.Length];

double sum = values.Sum();
int totalPercent = 100;
for (int i = 0; i < values.Length; i++) {
    double rawPercent = sum == 0 ? 0 : values[i] / sum * totalPercent;
    sum -= values[i];
    int roundedPercent = (int)Math.Round(rawPercent);
    totalPercent -= roundedPercent;
    percent[i] = roundedPercent;
}
// values         =  { 17.2,   3.7,    4.6,    5.8 }
//
// Percents:
// percent        => { 55,     12,     15,     18 }
// raw (exact)    => { 54.952, 11.821, 14.696, 18.530 }   (rounded to 3 decimals)
// raw continuous => { 54.952, 11.809, 14.596, 18.000 }

It is not perfect, however the error should never exceed 1%. Here is another example

values         =  { 10.0,   10.0,   10.0,   10.0,   10.0,   10.0 }

Percents:
rounded        => { 17,     17,     16,     17,     16,     17 }
raw (exact)    => { 16.667, 16.667, 16.667, 16.667, 16.667, 16.667 }   
raw continuous => { 16.667, 16.600, 16.500, 16.667, 16.500  17.000 }
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Good idea, but this assumes that the total will always be 100%. Which is unclear from the question. –  jb. Feb 9 '12 at 20:57
2  
I'm still all for not rounding in the first place. You'd still have issues with 33.33333 stuff, but that's unavoidable no matter what method you use, unless you force them to add up to 100%. –  Zenexer Feb 9 '12 at 21:06
1  
This solution does not work well, especially with more than three values. With, for example, 10 values, you could have the final value rounding up or down up to 5% away from its actual value! –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Feb 9 '12 at 22:40
    
With many values, I would round them one by one, subtract the rounded value from 100% (or what is left from it) and distribute the remaining values among the remaining percents until no more values are left. However, the OP explicitly mentions three values. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Feb 10 '12 at 12:35
    
@Oliver: that has the same problem. The correct solution would be to add the unrounded values, then round at the end (see Dour's answer) –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Feb 12 '12 at 23:34

Do not add rounded values and expect to get anything meaningful. Add the unrounded values. If that does not do what you want, you have to explain what you think you're accomplishing by adding rounded values.

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If you don't care that the values might sum to less than 100, the simple solution is just to use Math.Floor throughout.

It gets more interesting if you want to round up/down and have the result be exactly 100. Here is one approach – round them all down, then round them up selectively biggest-fraction-first until you hit 100 again:

public static void RoundTo100Percent(IList<double> list)
{
    // get the sort order before changing any items
    IList<int> sortOrder = list.Select((n, i) => new { Key = n - Math.Truncate(n), Index = i }).OrderByDescending(ki => ki.Key).Select(ki => ki.Index).ToList();

    // round them all down to start with
    for (int i = 0; i < list.Count; i++)
    {
        list[i] = Math.Floor(list[i]);
    }

    // then round them up selectively, starting with those with the highest fractional part
    // e.g. 5.9 will round up to 6.0 before 7.8 rounds up to 8.0.
    int numberOfItemsToRoundUp = 100 - (int)list.Sum();
    foreach (int sortIndex in sortOrder.Take(numberOfItemsToRoundUp))
    {
        list[sortIndex]++;
    }
}
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Can't you just do a check at the end like this:

if (total > 100)
  total = 100;
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3  
but then, which of the 3 values does he need to reduce? and by how much? –  jb. Feb 9 '12 at 20:54
    
That is a different issue. Are we sure that's what OP even needs? He never explicitly requests that. –  Oleksi Feb 9 '12 at 20:55
4  
Or go with Math.Min(total, 100) instead. –  Adam S Feb 9 '12 at 20:58

Well, if you don't round, then they'll all add up to 100%. Use floats/doubles/decimals. Problem solved.

After all, why would you want to decrease your accuracy?--which is what rounding does, by the way.

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It's probably best to round down on all accounts and then have the remaining balance as "statistical rounding" or something similar.

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Why not add all 3 values together, then round the final result? 33.3 + 33.3 + 33.3 = 99.9 which then rounds to 100, rounding individually would only come out at 99 as each one would round down.

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This problem arose for me when I had to import data into a system that required integer percentages for the set of rows pertaining to each user to add to exactly one hundred.

It is important to realise that there is no 'correct' way to do this. For example, given three values each equal to 1/3, having a rounded total equal to 99, which value should 1 be added to to force the total to be 100? There is no right answer. Just pick one.

Here is my solution in PHP:

function ensureColumnAddsToOneHundred(&$rows, $columnIndex)
{
   $percentagesTotalError = getColumnTotal($rows, $columnIndex) - 100;

   if ($percentagesTotalError > count($rows))
   {
      throw new Exception('Percentages total rounding error larger than nValues!');
   }

   // Add or subtract one from as many rows as is
   // necessary to ensure that the total is exactly 100.
   for ($i = 0; $i < abs($percentagesTotalError); ++$i)
   {
      $rows[$i][$columnIndex] += ($percentagesTotalError > 0)? -1: 1;
   }

   if (getColumnTotal($rows, $columnIndex) != 100)
   {
      throw new Exception('Percentages total not equal to 100 even after corrections!');
   }
}
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