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I am not sure I am doing things the right way, or if I have it all hacked up.

I have a really simple test application (not document-based) I created for learning how to work with application-modal dialogs in Cocoa applications.

With the application project "TestModalDialog", I have a simple MainMenu.xib with the default view and a button, "Show Dialog", I added. I created a second XIB called TheDialog.xib that has "Cancel" and "OK" buttons. That xib has as its owner a class derived from NSWindowController called "TheDialogController"; the window outlet and delegate are connected to the controller.

Selection of "Show Dialog" on the main view will launch the dialog. Selection of "Cancel" or "OK" will dismiss the dialog. Here is the pretty simple code:

//  TestModalDialogAppDelegate.h  
//  TestModalDialog  

#import <Cocoa/Cocoa.h>  

@class TheDialogController;  

@interface TestModalDialogAppDelegate : NSObject <NSApplicationDelegate>  
{  
  NSWindow *window;  
  TheDialogController* theDialogController;  
}  

@property (assign) IBOutlet NSWindow *window;  
- (IBAction)showDialog:(id)sender;  

@end  

//  TestModalDialogAppDelegate.m  
//  TestModalDialog  

#import "TestModalDialogAppDelegate.h"  
#import "TheDialogController.h"  

@implementation TestModalDialogAppDelegate  

@synthesize window;  

- (void)applicationDidFinishLaunching:(NSNotification *)aNotification  
{  
  theDialogController= [[TheDialogController alloc] init];  
}  

- (void)dealloc  
{
  if(nil != theDialogController)   
    [theDialogController release];  

  [super dealloc];  
}  

- (IBAction)showDialog:(id)sender  
{  
  if(nil == theDialogController)  
  {  
    NSAlert* alert= [NSAlert alertWithMessageText:@"Dialog Error" defaultButton:nil alternateButton:nil otherButton:nil informativeTextWithFormat:@"The dialog controller was not allocated."];  
    [alert runModal];  
    return;  
  }

  NSInteger result= [NSApp runModalForWindow:[theDialogController window]]; 
  // Do something with result.... 
}  
@end  

//  TheDialogController.h  
//  TestModalDialog  

#import <Cocoa/Cocoa.h>  

@interface TheDialogController : NSWindowController  
{  
  // BOOL userClickedCloseOrOk; // Removed based on answer.  
  // Should declare a common define - just being lazy.  
  NSInteger userClickedOk;  // Added based on answer.  
  UInt16 timesShown;   
}  

- (IBAction)showWindow:(id)sender;  
- (IBAction)closeDialog:(id)sender;  
- (IBAction)okDialog:(id)sender;  
//- (BOOL)windowShouldClose:(id)sender;   // Removed based on answer.  
- (void)windowWillClose:(NSNotification*)notification;  // Added based on answer.   
- (void)windowDidBecomeKey:(NSNotification*)notification;  // To set title when modal.  
@end  

//  TheDialogController.m  
//  TestModalDialog  

#import "TheDialogController.h"  

@implementation TheDialogController  

- (id)init  
{  
  self = [super initWithWindowNibName:@"TheDialog"];  

  userClickedOk= 0;  // Added based on answer.  
  // userClickedCloseOrOk= FALSE;  // Removed based on answer.  

  return self;  
}  

-(void)dealloc  
{  
  // Do member cleanup if needed.
  [super dealloc];  
}  

- (void)windowDidLoad  
{  
  [super windowDidLoad];  

  // Initialize as needed....  
  [[self window] center];  // Center the window.  
}  

// Does not show with runModalForWindow.  
- (IBAction)showWindow:(id)sender  
{  
  // Just playing with the window title....  
  ++timesShown;  
  NSString* newTitle= [NSString stringWithFormat:@"Shown %d Times", timesShown];  
  [[self window] setTitle:newTitle];  
  return [super showWindow:sender];  
}  

// This method no longer used for this solution based on the answer.  
//- (BOOL)windowShouldClose:(id)sender  
//{  
//  if(!userClickedCloseOrOk)  // The user did not click one of our buttons.  
//    [NSApp abortModal];  
//  else  
//    userClickedCloseOrOk= FALSE;  // Clear for next time.  
//  
//  return TRUE;  
//}  

// Added based on answer.  
- (void)windowWillClose:(NSNotification*)notification  
{  
  [NSApp stopModalWithCode:userClickedOk];  
  userClickedOk= 0;  // Reset for next time.  
}  

// Note - the title will update every time the window becomes key. To do the  
// update only once per modal session, a flag can be added. There might be a better  
// notification to catch.  
- (void)windowDidBecomeKey:(NSNotification*)notification  
{  
  ++timesShown;  
  NSString* newTitle= [NSString stringWithFormat:@"Shown %d Times", timesShown];  
  [[self window] setTitle:newTitle];  
}  

- (IBAction)closeDialog:(id)sender  
{  
  //userClickedCloseOrOk= TRUE;  // Removed based on answer.  
  //[NSApp abortModal];  // Removed based on answer.  
  //[[self window] performClose:self];  // Removed based on answer.  
  [[self window] close];  // Know we want to close - based on answer.  
}  

- (IBAction)okDialog:(id)sender  
{  
  userClickedOk= 1;  // Added based on answer.  
  //userClickedCloseOrOk= TRUE;  // Removed based on answer.  
  //[NSApp stopModal];  // Removed based on answer.  
  //[[self window] performClose:self];  // Removed based on answer.  
  [[self window] close];  // Know we want to close - based on answer.  
}    

@end  

I had trouble with the modality - before I put in userClickedCloseOrOk and tests, if the user hit the close button (upper-left red dot), the dialog would close but the modal session was still running.

I realize I could just leave the close-button off the dialog to start with, but with it there, is what I have demonstrated a good way to catch that scenario, or is there a better way? Or, am I doing something wrong to start with, which creates that problem for me?

Any advice would be appreciated.

NOTE - Code from the original example commented out and replaced with code based on the answer. Also added a new notification handler.

share|improve this question
    
Is there a better way than windowDidBecomeKey: or windowDidBecomeMain: to know when the window has been displayed in a modal session? I ask because I would like to know when the modal session actually starts. I could create/destroy the window each time, and then use windowDidLoad, but that does not seem very efficient. I could also send in a flag to tell the window it is about to show in a modal session, and manage it from either of the notifications - again, that feels like a hack. Or, should I just use a sheet instead? –  GTAE86 Feb 10 '12 at 19:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In the okDialog: and closeDialog: methods call close instead of performClose: to avoid the window calling the windowShouldClose: delegate method. That way you don't need userClickedCloseOrOk.

Also I think you want to be calling stopModalWithCode: instead of stopModal since in the app delegate you seem to be interested in the result. And you can call stopModal or stopModalWithCode: instead of abortModal because you are always in the runloop when you call it (abort is for when you are outside of the modal runloop, like in another thread or timer's runloop).

In windowShouldClose: you are doing an action (abortModal) when you should only be answering the question "should this window close". The windowWillClose: delegate method is where you should do actions if you need to.

Sheets are useful when there is one window and it tells the user they can't do anything with it until they complete whatever is in the sheet. Application-modal windows are useful when you have multiple windows that the user can't interact with until they complete whatever is in the modal window or where there is an error that involves the whole application but is not tied to the content of one window. In their HIG Apple suggests avoiding the use of Application-modal windows whenever possible.

share|improve this answer
    
Changing from performClose to close really did not change anything. The reason I have the check for userClickedCloseOrOk in windowShouldClose is to catch when the user hits the close button on the frame (the standard close button). When I catch it I can call abortModal - or even stopModal. Otherwise, the modal session does not end and I have to force-quit the application. What I am doing seems like a hack, and it feels like it would not be needed if I manage the modal dialog the "right" way - whatever that may be. Thanks for the clarification on abortModal vs. stopModal. –  GTAE86 Feb 10 '12 at 14:17
    
Aaahhh I think I see more of what you mean now - move the modal end stuff to windowWillClose, and I will not need it anywhere else. I can then set a code as appropriate in okDialog: or closeDialog: in and just call stopModalWithCode:. Nice. –  GTAE86 Feb 10 '12 at 14:25

I have actually just been struggling with the same problem and found this link :

Stopping modal when window is closed (Cocoa)

share|improve this answer
    
Kind of in the vein of "Am I doing the right thing in the first place". I struggled at first with whether I should be using a sheet or modal dialog. I could not easily find a good answer. I struggled for a day on how to just get the thing to behave at all. It came down to figuring out how to connect the window outlet to the controller...and figuring out what question to really ask. –  GTAE86 Feb 9 '12 at 21:46
    
I also considered using sheets, but I wanted my window to be movable and not attached to the parent window. If you use OS X exposé with sheets, you don't see the modal window as an extra one. Call me a nerd, but I didn't want that :) –  guitarflow Feb 9 '12 at 21:48

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