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I ran a static code analysis tool on our tool and looking at its results the code below was one of the things it was talking about:

    SpreadSnapshot oSnap = new SpreadSnapshot();
    using (oSnap.SetRowCol(fpSpread, row, col))
    {
        SpreadSetComboBox(fpSpread, list, displayProperty);
    }

So I changed it to the code below and it fixed the error that the tool was talking about:

    using (SpreadSnapshot oSnap = new SpreadSnapshot())
    {
        oSnap.SetRowCol(fpSpread, row, col);
        SpreadSetComboBox(fpSpread, list, displayProperty);
    }

So in your opinion Which style of coding do you think is more appropriate and less error-prone?

Thanks

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closed as off topic by Kyle Trauberman, L.B, Hamish, Chris Shain, Grant Thomas Feb 9 '12 at 21:47

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2  
Code Review exists for questions like this. –  Kyle Trauberman Feb 9 '12 at 21:31
    
And just what error was it talking about? –  Chris Feb 9 '12 at 21:31
    
@KyleTrauberman: this 500K code has been converted from VB 6.0 to C# with some tools, we couldn't code review all of it again, so we are refactoring stuff like this as we see them in code. –  BDotA Feb 9 '12 at 21:33
    
That's fine. I'm just saying there is a site for code reviews that you should use, as they are considered off topic on Stack Overflow. –  Kyle Trauberman Feb 9 '12 at 21:35
    
Are those two examples doing the same thing? It looks like, in the first, the result of SetRowCol is disposed. In the second, oSnap is disposed. –  ken Feb 9 '12 at 21:35
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The two mean completely different things, unless SetRowCol returns this at the end. In the first, you're disposing the results of SetRowCol. In the second, you're disposing the SpreadSnapshot.

If both are disposable, you should do a using for both:

using (SpreadSnapshot oSnap = new SpreadSnapshot())
using (oSnap.SetRowCol(fpSpread, row, col))
{
    SpreadSetComboBox(fpSpread, list, displayProperty);
}
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correct, it was returning "this", so the first code is still correct. right? –  BDotA Feb 9 '12 at 22:13
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The latter - it ensures that you don't end up using oSnap after the using statement.

Aside from anything else, it would be pretty odd for SetRowCol to return something disposable... what would that even mean?

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I'm using the using statement when I'm doing linq-to-sql (using DataContext....). What's the difference between using a using statement and instantiating an object? –  frenchie Feb 9 '12 at 21:35
    
@frenchie: That's too big a question to easily answer in comments, but it should be covered in any good introductory C# book. I strongly suggest you read up on the using statement before continuing... –  Jon Skeet Feb 9 '12 at 21:38
    
@JonSkeet: Thanks Jon, does the first coding style will cause memory leaks too? –  BDotA Feb 9 '12 at 21:40
    
ok, I will. Does it affect performance or just pattern/readability? –  frenchie Feb 9 '12 at 21:41
    
@frenchie: It affects automatically disposing of resources. The first form will leak (probably temporarily) if the object has resources which need disposing and SetRowCol throws an exception. –  Jon Skeet Feb 9 '12 at 21:41
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