Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In Java, which is considered more taxing? Implementing another thread and using wait notify or incorporating a for/while loop inside a current thread similar to this >

while(running){

 //do stuff

   if(skip == 20){

      //do more stuff
      skip = 0;

   }else{
      skip++;
   }
   }

I'm gonna guess the latter is not considered best practice but I don't want to end up spending too much memory on an extra thread that does very little.

share|improve this question
4  
Did you happen to notice when you try that the fans on your machine come on really loud as you burn up an entire core at 100% utilization? Aside from that, assuming you have a sleep somewhere or this isn't an infinite loop ... threads are meant for parallelization of work. If you don't need that or it doesn't apply to your problem, you don't use additional threads. –  Brian Roach Feb 9 '12 at 21:37
1  
For the sake of your processor, use a new thread. You're gonna bring the poor thing to its knees like this. –  Gunther Fox Feb 9 '12 at 21:41
    
@BrianRoach I'll take that as an answer xD (btw its phone, no cooling fans) –  Jack Feb 9 '12 at 21:42
    
@BrianRoach android tag and fans don't usually come together :) –  Oleg Mikheev Feb 9 '12 at 21:42
    
Doh! Missed that. Even worse, you just created a hand warmer! –  Brian Roach Feb 9 '12 at 21:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

(moved to being an answer)

Assuming you have a sleep somewhere or this isn't an infinite loop ... threads are meant for parallelization of work; e.g. you want to do two things at the same time on two different cores. If you don't need that or it doesn't apply to your problem, you don't use additional threads.

If you don't have a sleep or other blocking operation and it is an infinite loop, you just created a hand warmer app (or a battery drainer app ...)

share|improve this answer

If that's the flow you need, ie 'stuff' and 'more stuff' are not expected to run in parallel, then the counter/skip loop is fine - don't go near signaling other threads just to run 'more stuff' after every 20 'stuff'.

share|improve this answer
    
is that so? It doesn't seem to be what the others are saying. Does it depend on how much "more stuff" there is? –  Jack Feb 9 '12 at 21:46
    
@KrzysztofKozielczyk Okay if I just want a delay then threads is the answer? –  Jack Feb 9 '12 at 22:14
    
@Jack Sorry, I deleted my comment in the meantime. I realized I didn't really understand the question (I don't think it contains enough data yet). If do stuff is meaningful work that takes significant time then I agree with Martin's suggestion and the loop should be fine. If it is trivial code that takes no time then you're going to create hand warmer as @BrianRoach pointed out. –  Krzysztof Kozielczyk Feb 9 '12 at 23:00

I don't have a specific answer but I would like to suggest a principle to follow. Each iteration of your loop should include a blocking operation, and the blocking operation should have a timeout so that it doesn't block forever. If you don't have any blocking operation you could use sleep (or better, wait for an event with a timeout, see below).

If you want to improve the responsibility of breaking your main loop use an event instead of a bool flag to control the main loop. This way when the event is signaled the loop will break immediately. In pseudo-code:

while(!wait_for(cancelLoopEvent, immediate))
{
    // do stuff

    if(time_to_work())
    {
        // do the work
    }
    else
    {
        wait_for(cancelLoopEvent, loop_timeout)
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.