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According to this reddit comment thread, it is undefined if an attempt is made to read memory before it has been written to. I'm referring to normal heap memory which has been succesfully malloced.

... note that this is not strictly valid C: the compiler/runtime system is allowed to initialize uninitialized memory with so-called trap representations, which cause undefined behavior on access.

I find this hard to believe. Is there a Standard quote?

Of course, I understand that there is no guarantee that the memory has been zeroed out. The values in this uninitialized memory are essentially pseudo-random or arbitrary. But I can't really believe that the Standard would refer to this as undefined behaviour (in the sense that it might segfault, or delete all your files, or whatever). The rest of the reddit thread there didn't cast any more light on this issue.

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Erm, what do you think undefined behavior means? (Yes, using allocated memory before it has been initialized produces undefined behavior) –  Brian Roach Feb 9 '12 at 22:38
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@Brian I assume he's asking whether the entire behavior (ie will this segfault) is undefined, or just the value that would result from reading. –  Owen Feb 9 '12 at 22:40
    
@Owen, that's right, I've updated the question accordingly. –  Aaron McDaid Feb 9 '12 at 22:42
    
You can't have a subset of undefined. It means the behavior is not defined. Will it segfault? Who knows; the behavior is undefined. This doesn't mean it will segfault or delete your files, in fact, it probably won't do anything bad ... but you can't rely on that because there's nothing to say it won't. –  Brian Roach Feb 9 '12 at 22:48
    
The memory is indeterminate, and this is listed as undefined behavior in the non-normative Annex J (Portability), but I couldn't find anything normative explicitly stating that accessing indeterminate memory is U.B. –  David Thornley Feb 9 '12 at 22:50

3 Answers 3

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If accessing through a char*, this is defined. But otherwise, this is undefined behavior.

(C99, 7.20.3.3) "The malloc function allocates space for an object whose size is specified by size and whose value is indeterminate."

on indeterminate value:

(C99, 3.17.2p1) "indeterminate value: either an unspecified value or a trap representation"

on trap representation reading through a non-character type being undefined behavior:

(C99, 6.2.6.1p5) "Certain object representations need not represent a value of the object type. If the stored value of an object has such a representation and is read by an lvalue expression that does not have character type, the behavior is undefined. [...] Such a representation is called a trap representation."

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Add a standard quote stating that accessing a trap representation results in undefined behavior, and you'll have the complete chain. (But, as of this comment, you're still missing that one.) –  Brooks Moses Feb 9 '12 at 22:44
    
@BrooksMoses done –  ouah Feb 9 '12 at 22:47
    
@BrooksMoses, that's the big question. What does "trap representation" mean? –  Aaron McDaid Feb 9 '12 at 22:47
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@ouah, so it is well-defined (but arbitrary/indeterminate) if a char* is used? –  Aaron McDaid Feb 9 '12 at 22:49
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@AaronMcDaid if you dereference a char * yes: the standard makes it clear that character types have no trap representation. –  ouah Feb 9 '12 at 22:51

It rationally has to be undefined. Otherwise, the necessary behavior of a C program running under something like Valgrind, which diagnoses reads of uninitialized memory and throws appropriate errors when they occur, would be illegal under the standard.

Reading the standard, the key question is whether the values of malloc'ed memory are "unspecified values" (which must be some readable value), or "indeterminate values" (which may contain trap representations; c.f. definition 3.17.2.)

As per 7.20.3.3, quoted in the other answers, malloc returns a block of memory which contains indeterminate values, and therefore may contain trap representations. The relevant discussion of trap representations is 6.2.6.1, part 5:

Certain object representations need not represent a value of the object type. If the stored value of an object has such a representation and is read by an lvalue expression that does not have character type, the behavior is undefined. ... Such a representation is called a trap representation.

So, there you go. Basically, the C implementation is permitted to detect (i.e., "trap") references to indeterminate values, and deal with that error how it chooses, including in undefined ways.

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ISO/IEC 9899:1999, 7.20.3.3 The malloc function:

The malloc function allocates space for an object whose size is specified by size and whose value is indeterminate.

6.2.6.1 Representation of types, §5:

Certain object representations need not represent a value of the object type. If the stored value of an object has such a representation and is read by an lvalue expression that does not have character type, the behavior is undefined.

And footnote 41 makes it even more explicit (at least for automatic variables):

Thus, an automatic variable can be initialized to a trap representation without causing undefined behavior, but the value of the variable cannot be used until a proper value is stored in it.

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I have no problem with 'indeterminate value'. That is clear in the answer. The question is whether the behaviour is totally undefined (segfaults and so on). –  Aaron McDaid Feb 9 '12 at 22:44
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So it's OK via char*? Can you give an example of such an object? I'm trying to remember how doubles are represented - perhaps not all bit-configurations map to a valid double. Is this the type of thing that is being referred to here? –  Aaron McDaid Feb 9 '12 at 22:51
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There are various sorts of NaN ("not a number") values that are part of the double standard representation, but those are still "valid". –  Brooks Moses Feb 9 '12 at 22:58
    
I've just noticed that I said 'indeterminate value', when I should have said something 'unspecified value'. To me, they both seem to mean the same thing, but it appears they have different meanings in C standardese! –  Aaron McDaid Feb 9 '12 at 23:06
    
@AaronMcDaid: Undefined != segfault. For example, the expression a++ + a++ invokes undefined behavior, but you'll be hard-pressed to find a platform that will actually segfault on that (if you do, eek). Although to be fair, we are talking about trap representations here. –  John Bode Feb 9 '12 at 23:28

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