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I'm a AS3 coder and i do a bit of php and i am having a hard time doing a static class that can cache variables.

Here's what i have so far :

<?php
class Cache {

private static $obj;

public static function getInstance() {
    if (is_null(self::$obj)){
        $obj = new stdClass();
    }
    if (!self::$instance instanceof self) { 
        self::$instance = new self;
    }
    return self::$instance;
}

public static function set($key,$value){
  self::$obj->$key = $value;
}

public static function get($key){
  return  self::$obj->$key;
}
}
?>

And i use the following to set my variable into an object of my static class :

<?php 
include 'cache.php';
$cache = new Cache();
$cache->set("foo", "bar");
?>

And this is retrieve the variable

 <?php 
include 'cache.php';
$cache = new Cache();
$echo = $cache->get("foo");
echo $echo //doesn't echo anything
?>

What am i doing wrong ? Thank you

share|improve this question
    
Your issue here is that you're trying to construct a singleton, but you cannot instantiate it. When you set foo, you're storing the value in that particular instance. But you're creating a new instance when you want to retrieve it. –  leemachin Feb 9 '12 at 23:24
    
@fuzzyDunlop , ok i see so i went $cache = Cache::getInstance(); $cache->set("foo", "bar"); to set and $cache = Cache::getInstance(); echo $cache->get("foo"); still doesn't work :( –  Eric Feb 9 '12 at 23:28
    
In this code, your get and set methods are static, so you need to use :: instead of -> when calling them. –  leemachin Feb 9 '12 at 23:41
    
Thanks fuzzyDunlop :) –  Eric Feb 10 '12 at 0:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I've adapted @prodigitalson's code above to get something rudimentary that works (and has much room for improvement):

class VarCache {
  protected static $instance;
  protected static $data = array();

  protected function __construct() {}

  public static function getInstance() {
     if(!self::$instance) {
       self:$instance = new self();
     }

     return self::$instance;
  }

  public function get($key) {
     self::getInstance();

     return isset(self::$data[$key]) ? self::$data[$key] : null;
  }

  public function set($key, $value) {
     self::getInstance();
     self::$data[$key] = $value;
  }
}

Usage

VarCache::set('foo', 'bar');
echo VarCache::get('foo');
// 'bar'

You'll want this class to be available everywhere you need it, and if you want it to persist between requests, I'd consider using Memcached or something similar, which will give you everything you need.

You could alternatively use some SPL functions, like ArrayObject, if you wanted to be clever :)

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed that worked, thank you. I'll check Memcached :) –  Eric Feb 9 '12 at 23:37
    
Indeed Memcache (without the D - I'm on WAMP) was what i really needed. I just installed it and it rules. For people like me on WAMP who want to install it as well, check this out : shikii.net/blog/installing-memcached-for-php-5-3-on-windows-7 –  Eric Feb 10 '12 at 0:27

Try this:

class VarCache {
  protected $instance;
  protected $data = array();
  protected __construct() {}

  public static function getInstance()
  {
     if(!self::$instance) {
       self:$instance = new self();
     }

     return self::$instance;
  }

  public function __get($key) {
     return isset($this->data[$key]) ? $this->data[$key] : null;
  }

  public function __set($key, $value) {
     $this->data[$key] = $value;
  }
}

// usage

VarCache::getInstance()->theKey = 'somevalue';
echo VarCache::getInstance()->theKey;
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm did copy paste this exact code and didn't echo anything.. –  Eric Feb 9 '12 at 23:22

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