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This is not working. Firebug is not throwing any error though.

HTML:

<table>
       <tr><td>BookA</td><td><a href="javascript:deleteRow($(this));" class="red">Delete</a></td></tr>
       <tr><td>BookB</td><td><a href="javascript:deleteRow($(this));" class="red">Delete</a></td></tr>
        <tr><td>BookC</td><td><a href="javascript:deleteRow($(this));" class="red">Delete</a></td></tr>
        <tr><td>BookD</td><td><a href="javascript:deleteRow($(this));" class="red">Delete</a></td></tr>
</table>

Javascript:

function deleteRow(ref) {   
    $(ref).parent().parent().remove(); 
 }

If possible, I would like to use a solution with inline javascript

share|improve this question
3  
Why would you want to use a solution with inline javascript? If you have some limitation on where you can put the code you can just throw a script tag at the bottom of your table with the code being given to you. Inline JS is ugly, unnecessary, hard to maintain and easy to mess up. –  Paolo Bergantino May 28 '09 at 17:34

6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

First of all, inline JavaScript (href="javascript:x" or onclick="x") is generally bad. With inline JavaScript, you won't have access to the event object, and you can't really be sure what this references to.

jQuery (and almost every other JavaScript library/framework) has built-in event handling. So, your code would look like this with event handlers:

$('a.red').click(function(e) {
  e.preventDefault(); // don't follow the link
  $(this).closest('tr').remove(); // credits goes to MrKurt for use of closest()
});

And here's a demo: http://jsbin.com/okaxu

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the demo –  RedFilter May 28 '09 at 17:19
    
Wow, a demo even! +1 –  dalbaeb May 28 '09 at 17:20
    
> you won't have access to the event object, and you can't really be sure what this references to. That it is why I am passing it as an argument –  Sergio del Amo May 28 '09 at 17:21
2  
I would use parents('tr') over parent().parent() - other than that, nice answer. –  Paolo Bergantino May 28 '09 at 17:21
2  
.parents('tr') will grab all ancestor tr elements, which isn't right. I'd use .closest('tr'). –  MrKurt May 28 '09 at 17:30

This won't work because $(this) isn't referring to the a-tag as you think (I think its referring to the window object or something)

Instead of using inline javascript in the href-attribute do this

Instead do this

<script type="text/javascript">
 $("table a").click( function() {
  $(this).parent().parent().remove();
 });
</script>
share|improve this answer
    
don't forget to wrap this in document.ready function –  dalbaeb May 28 '09 at 17:19
    
You have syntax error with the first ".paren()" - missing a "t" –  Jose Basilio May 28 '09 at 17:29
    
Thank you and fixed! =) –  Kenny Eliasson May 28 '09 at 18:00

I would have to agree that inline javascript should be avoided, but if there is some other reason that it is necessary or beneficial to use it, here's how.

<table>
   <tr><td>BookA</td><td><a href='#' onclick="$(this).parents('tr').remove(); return false;" class="red">Delete</a></td></tr>
   <tr><td>BookB</td><td><a href='#' onclick="$(this).parents('tr').remove(); return false;" class="red">Delete</a></td></tr>
   <tr><td>BookC</td><td><a href='#' onclick="$(this).parents('tr').remove(); return false;" class="red">Delete</a></td></tr>
   <tr><td>BookD</td><td><a href='#' onclick="$(this).parents('tr').remove(); return false;" class="red">Delete</a></td></tr>
</table>
share|improve this answer

Try this:

// Bind all the td element a click event
$('table td.deleteRow').click(function(){
    $(this).parent().remove();
});

By the way, it'll remove the javascript from your html code. With this html code

<table>
    <tr>
    	<td>BookA</td>
    	<td class="red deleteRow">Delete</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    	<td>BookB</td>
    	<td class="red deleteRow">Delete</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    	<td>BookC</td>
    	<td class="red deleteRow">Delete</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
    	<td>BookD</td>
    	<td class="red deleteRow">Delete</td>
    </tr>
</table>
share|improve this answer
    
The selector should be "a.red" to replicate what he's trying to do. –  Paolo Bergantino May 28 '09 at 17:20
1  
Yes, I was editing my post. But i use a new deleteRow class because i thought the red class was just here for the presentation... and maybe used elsewhere ! –  Boris Guéry May 28 '09 at 17:23
    
I prefer the deleteRow. I just use red to to use a css .red {color: red;} –  Sergio del Amo May 28 '09 at 17:24
    
Fair enough; still, though, you should keep the link, as without it you lose the pointer hand (which you can get back with CSS, but why?) and lose semantic meaning. –  Paolo Bergantino May 28 '09 at 17:24
    
If he links it with a database (and then a server-side script) or something then you are right ! But if you want to respect semantic, i think in this case an input button should be the best since a click on it will trigger an action, and not forward the user somewhere.. –  Boris Guéry May 28 '09 at 17:29

remove inline scripting

<script>
    $(function(){
        $('table td a').live('click', function(){
            $(this).parents('tr').remove();
            return false;
        });
    });
</script>
share|improve this answer

I believe you have a bug in your deleteRow function. Here's how it should be written:

function deleteRow(ref) {   
    ref.parent().parent().remove(); 
}

The ref that you are passing into deleteRow is already a jQuery object. You shouldn't use $(ref), just ref alone since ref is already a jQuery object.

share|improve this answer
    
this does not work –  Sergio del Amo May 28 '09 at 17:15
2  
That's not a bug. It is unnecessary but not a bug. You can for example run $($(img)) with no errors –  Nadia Alramli May 28 '09 at 17:18

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