Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In Rx when using Scheduler.NewThread for ObserveOn method, what is the advantage of having each Observation delegate (OnNext) running on a new thread, when Rx already guarantees that the OnNexts will never overlap. If every OnNext is going to be called one after another, why need new thread for each of them.

I understand why would one want to run Observation delegates on a thread different than the subscription and application thread but running each observation delegate on a new thread when they will never run in parallel?.... doesn't make sense to me or am I missing something here?

For Example

using System;
using System.Linq;
using System.Reactive.Concurrency;
using System.Reactive.Linq;
using System.Threading;

namespace RxTesting
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Application Thread : {0}", Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);

            var numbers = from number in Enumerable.Range(1,10) select Process(number);

            var observableNumbers = numbers.ToObservable()
                .ObserveOn(Scheduler.NewThread)
                .SubscribeOn(Scheduler.NewThread);

            observableNumbers.Subscribe(
                n => Console.WriteLine("Consuming : {0} \t on Thread : {1}", n, Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId));

            Console.ReadKey();
        }

        private static int Process(int number)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(500);
            Console.WriteLine("Producing : {0} \t on Thread : {1}", number,
                              Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);

            return number;
        }
    }
}

The above code produces following result. Notice the Consuming is done on a new thread each time.

Application Thread : 8
Producing : 1    on Thread : 9
Consuming : 1    on Thread : 10
Producing : 2    on Thread : 9
Consuming : 2    on Thread : 11
Producing : 3    on Thread : 9
Consuming : 3    on Thread : 12
Producing : 4    on Thread : 9
Consuming : 4    on Thread : 13
Producing : 5    on Thread : 9
Consuming : 5    on Thread : 14
Producing : 6    on Thread : 9
Consuming : 6    on Thread : 15
Producing : 7    on Thread : 9
Consuming : 7    on Thread : 16
Producing : 8    on Thread : 9
Consuming : 8    on Thread : 17
Producing : 9    on Thread : 9
Consuming : 9    on Thread : 18
Producing : 10   on Thread : 9
Consuming : 10   on Thread : 19
share|improve this question
    
Where are you seeing examples of code having each Observation delegate (OnNext) running on its own thread? –  Robert Harvey Feb 9 '12 at 23:55
    
@Robert Harvey: i have included sample code to reproduce the issue –  nabeelfarid Feb 10 '12 at 0:44
    
So are you saying that each consumption waits for the previous one to finish? That doesn't make any sense. If you consume each observation on a separate thread, that consumption can execute asynchronously, while other consumptions take place on their own threads. If you consume each OnNext on its own thread, that thread immediately frees up the OnNext queue to fire off the next thread. While the consumptions are fired off sequentially, they can still be processed concurrently. –  Robert Harvey Feb 10 '12 at 0:49
    
yup thats exactly what I am saying and I initially thought that OnNexts will fire in parallel but they don't. This is a feature of Rx that it gaurantees that Order of the collection will be maintained and OnNext for 2 won't get fire until OnNext for 1 is complete. See akhildeshpande.com/2011/05/net-reactive-extensions-rx-2.html –  nabeelfarid Feb 10 '12 at 1:19
add comment

2 Answers 2

The NewThread scheduler is useful for long-running subscribers. If you don't specify any scheduler, the producer is blocked waiting the subscribers to complete. Often, you can use Scheduler.ThreadPool, but if you expect to have many many long running tasks, you won't want to clog up your thread pool with them (since it may be used by more than just the subscribers of a single observable).

For example, consider the following modification on your example. I moved the delay to the subscriber and added an indication of when the main thread was ready for keyboard input. Notice the difference when you uncomment NewThead lines.

using System;
using System.Linq;
using System.Reactive.Concurrency;
using System.Reactive.Linq;
using System.Threading;

namespace RxTesting
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Application Thread : {0}", Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);

            var numbers = from number in Enumerable.Range(1, 10) select Process(number);

            var observableNumbers = numbers.ToObservable()
//              .ObserveOn(Scheduler.NewThread)
//              .SubscribeOn(Scheduler.NewThread)
            ;

            observableNumbers.Subscribe(
                n => {
                    Thread.Sleep(500);
                    Console.WriteLine("Consuming : {0} \t on Thread : {1}", n, Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
                });

            Console.WriteLine("Waiting for keyboard");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }

        private static int Process(int number)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Producing : {0} \t on Thread : {1}", number,
                              Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);

            return number;
        }
    }
}

So why doesn't Rx optimize to use the same thread for each subscriber? If subscribers are so long running that you need a new thread, the thread creation overhead will be insignificant anyway. The one exception is that if most subscribers are short but a few are long running, then an optimization to reuse the same thread would indeed be useful.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I'd add that it allows somewhat more predictable execution than ThreadPool in cases where the thread pool is being heavily loaded by other operations. –  Chris Shain Feb 10 '12 at 4:10
    
@Edward: I don't understand your last point "If subscribers are so long running that you need a new thread, the thread creation overhead will be insignificant"? If Rx guarantees to run each subscriber sequentially, then whats the point of a new thread for each subscriber? –  nabeelfarid Feb 16 '12 at 0:33
    
@nabeelfarid: There is no point. However, it likely would require extra code in the Rx library to share the thread between subscribers, so my guess is that no one has bothered to write the optimization code on the assumption that it would never be noticed anyway. –  Edward Brey Feb 16 '12 at 5:20
add comment

I'm not sure if you have noticed but if the consumers are slower than the producers (e.g. if you add a longer Sleep in the subscribe Action) they will share the same thread, so it might be a mechanism of ensuring that the subscribers consume the content as soon as it's published.

namespace RxTesting
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Application Thread : {0}", Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);

            var numbers = from number in Enumerable.Range(1,10) select Process(number);

            var observableNumbers = numbers.ToObservable()
                .ObserveOn(Scheduler.NewThread)
                .SubscribeOn(Scheduler.NewThread);

            observableNumbers.Subscribe(
                n => 
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("Consuming : {0} \t on Thread : {1}", n, Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
                        Thread.Sleep(600);
                    }
                        );

            Console.ReadKey();
        }

        private static int Process(int number)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(500);
            Console.WriteLine("Producing : {0} \t on Thread : {1}", number,
                              Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);

            return number;
        }
    }
}

Outputs:

Application Thread : 1
Producing : 1    on Thread : 3
Consuming : 1    on Thread : 4
Producing : 2    on Thread : 3
Consuming : 2    on Thread : 4
Producing : 3    on Thread : 3
Consuming : 3    on Thread : 4
Producing : 4    on Thread : 3
Consuming : 4    on Thread : 4
Producing : 5    on Thread : 3
Consuming : 5    on Thread : 4
Producing : 6    on Thread : 3
Consuming : 6    on Thread : 4
Producing : 7    on Thread : 3
Producing : 8    on Thread : 3
Consuming : 7    on Thread : 4
Producing : 9    on Thread : 3
Consuming : 8    on Thread : 4
Producing : 10   on Thread : 3
Consuming : 9    on Thread : 4
Consuming : 10   on Thread : 4
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.