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I'm trying to self-teach myself C++, and once again I got stuck on something and can't seem to fix it. Please excuse the horrible mess of a code that you're about to see. This is also my first post on this site, so the post's format will probably be off too, sorry.

There are two files: main.cpp and vect1.h (no vect1.cpp because it seems templates like to only hang out in header files)


main.cpp:

#include <iostream>
#include "vect1.H"

using namespace std;

int main(){
    vect1<int> inst1(10);
    inst1[9]=4;
    cout<<inst1[9]<<endl;
    //-----
    vect1<double> inst2(10);
    inst2[5]=5.112;
    cout<<inst2[5]<<endl;
    //-----

    //====PART 2=====//
    cout<<"--------"<<endl;
    inst2[9]=999;
    cout<<inst2[9]<<endl;
    //inst2.pop();
    inst2.push(2);
    cout<<inst2[9]<<endl;
    cout<<inst2[10]<<endl;//New block
system("PAUSE");
return 0;}

vect1.h:

#ifndef VECT1_H
#define VECT1_H
#include <iostream> //DEBUG
template <class T>
class vect1{
private:
    T *ptr;
    T total; //work on this
    int units;
    int counter;
public:
    //vect1();
    vect1(T);
    vect1();
    T &operator[](const int &);
    void pop();
    void push(T);

};
//---------------------

/*
template <class T>
    vect1<T>::vect1(){
        ptr = new int [0];
    }
*/

template <class T>
    vect1<T>::vect1(T number){
        ptr = new T [number];
            total=0;
            units=(int)number;
        for(counter=0;counter<number;counter++){
            ptr[counter]=0;
        }
    }
    /* now the destruct is giving me errors...
template <class T>
    vect1<T>::~vect1(){
        total=0;
        delete[] ptr;
    }*/ //<<this line tosses a C2039 error

template <class T>
    T &vect1<T>::operator[](const int & ref){
        if(ref>0 && ref<(units)){
            return ptr[ref];
        }else{
            throw "Error! Out of range!"; //<<make catch 
        }
    }
//--------
template <class T>
    void vect1<T>::pop(){
        units = (units-1);
        T *tempPtr;
        tempPtr = new T[units];
            for(counter=0;counter<units;counter++){
                tempPtr[counter]=ptr[counter];
            }
        delete[] ptr;
        ptr = new T[units];
            for(counter=0;counter<units;counter++){
                ptr[counter]=tempPtr[counter];
            }
        delete[] tempPtr;
    }
//--
template <class T>
    void vect1<T>::push(T pushnum){
        units++;
        const int newsize=(int)units; //<<<<<
        T *tempPtr;
        tempPtr = new T[units];
            for(counter=0;counter<(units-1);counter++){
                tempPtr[counter]=ptr[counter];
            }
            //tempPtr[(int)units]=pushnum;
        delete[] ptr;
            std::cout<<units<<std::endl;//<<DEBUG
        ptr = new T[units];
            for(counter=0;counter<(units-1);counter++){
                ptr[counter]=tempPtr[counter];
                //ptr[9]=101;
            }
        ptr[newsize]=pushnum; /* <<bleh */
        //ptr[newsize]=12321; //DEBUG //<<Even this isn't working...
        delete[] tempPtr;
    }
//---------------------
#endif

output(in the console):

4
5.112
--------
999
11
999
-6.27744e+066
Press any key to continue . . .

The plan is to make it so when you pop() it will create a new temp array of T and copy everything but the last block from the original to the temp array, delete the original array, and then create a new array one size smaller than before and send everything back, deleting the temp array. Same idea for the push(number), only the opposite. Push would copy itself to temp, push would delete itself and then re-create itself as 1 size bigger, then send everything from temp to push and delete temp. Then send the number sent with push into the new block. So this program should print out '2' after the second "999" line. But instead I get "-6.27744e+066".

Pop() seems to work. Sorta. Having real issues with push(num) though. I also seem to suddenly get a C2039 error from my destructor. It wasn't doing that before, and I've yet to change anything in it.

I would really appreciate it if someone could look over this mess and give me some tips on what to fix. Thanks!

I use Visual Studio 2010 as my compiler.

This is my build log(with some nice errors/warnings to go with it!):

1>------ Rebuild All started: Project: chapter 16-5, Configuration: Debug Win32 ------
1>Build started 2/9/2012 5:34:01 PM.
1>_PrepareForClean:
1>  Deleting file "Debug\chapter 16-5.lastbuildstate".
1>InitializeBuildStatus:
1>  Creating "Debug\chapter 16-5.unsuccessfulbuild" because "AlwaysCreate" was specified.
1>ClCompile:
1>  main.cpp
1>e:\programming(cpp)\chapter 16-5\chapter 16-5\vect1.h(31): warning C4244: 'initializing' : conversion from 'double' to 'unsigned int', possible loss of data
1>          e:\programming(cpp)\chapter 16-5\chapter 16-5\vect1.h(30) : while compiling class template member function 'vect1<T>::vect1(T)'
1>          with
1>          [
1>              T=double
1>          ]
1>          e:\programming(cpp)\chapter 16-5\chapter 16-5\main.cpp(11) : see reference to class template instantiation 'vect1<T>' being compiled
1>          with
1>          [
1>              T=double
1>          ]
1>Manifest:
1>  Deleting file "Debug\chapter 16-5.exe.embed.manifest".
1>LinkEmbedManifest:
1>  chapter 16-5.vcxproj -> E:\Programming(CPP)\chapter 16-5\Debug\chapter 16-5.exe
1>FinalizeBuildStatus:
1>  Deleting file "Debug\chapter 16-5.unsuccessfulbuild".
1>  Touching "Debug\chapter 16-5.lastbuildstate".
1>
1>Build succeeded.
1>
1>Time Elapsed 00:00:10.62
========== Rebuild All: 1 succeeded, 0 failed, 0 skipped ==========
share|improve this question
3  
Look at the sources for std::vector. There are many traps when implementing a custom vector (almost always related to exception safety). Better for you is probably to learn how to use std::vector. –  Alexandre C. Feb 9 '12 at 23:44
    
You mean the basic vector that comes with "#include <vector>"? I've used it before but never actually looked at the code for it. Can't believe I didn't think of that. Thanks! –  Natriacid Feb 10 '12 at 0:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
template <class T>
vect1<T>::vect1(T number){
    ptr = new T [number];
    total=0;
    units=(int)number;
    for(counter=0; counter<number; counter++) {
        ptr[counter]=0;
    }
}

This constructor allocates space for number objects, but number has general type T and you cast it to int. If you want to have a vector of strings or objects, conversion to int fails. number should have type int. Casting is generally not needed and it could be a symptom of bad design (except inheritance - dynamic_cast).

Because T could be anything you can't initialize it in constructor and you must leave it to the user of your vector.


T &vect1<T>::operator[](const int & ref){

You use const reference because you were probably told that it is faster than passing by value. Well this is true for larger objects, not for int. Reference is basically just another pointer (with different syntax). The function is passed an address to the target variable. Pointer and int are usually equally large so there is no improvement here and accessing through pointer is definitely slower than directly accessing the value.


template <class T>
void vect1<T>::pop(){
    units = units-1;
    T *tempPtr = new T[units];
    for(counter=0;counter<units;counter++){
        tempPtr[counter]=ptr[counter];
    }
    delete[] ptr;
    ptr = tempPtr;
}

There is no need to copy data back to ptr it is enough to copy the pointer.


template <class T>
void vect1<T>::push(T pushnum){
    units++;        
    T *tempPtr = new T[units];
    for(counter=0;counter<(units-1);counter++){
        tempPtr[counter]=ptr[counter];
    }
    tempPtr[units-1]=pushnum; // New item is at units-1 position!
    delete[] ptr;
    ptr=tempPtr; // Again, just assign the pointer.
}

And add the destructor releasing allocated memory.

I hope this helped and I am sorry for my bad English.

share|improve this answer
    
Bleh. I still have such a long way to go. I forgot I could just toss the address of tempptr to ptr. There's so many mistakes and its so messy that I might as well start over. Time to delete everything and start from scratch! At least I'll remember things better the more I type them. Thanks! –  Natriacid Feb 10 '12 at 1:07

The immediate issue I spotted is this:

const int newsize=(int)units;
ptr = new T[units];
...    
ptr[newsize]=pushnum;

That is, you allocate newsize objects but here you are accessing an out of range value: there are only indices 0 ... newsize - 1 available. This also means that you probably missed initializing the value at index newsize - 1 which might led to the value you quoted.

That said, there are a few things I noticed while looking at the code:

  1. You don't need to allocate memory multiple times in you push() function! Just create an array big enough, copy the content over, and put it into place. In a real implementation of a resizable vector you would over-allocate space and only allocate new memory when this memory gets exhausted. When reallocating you would use a factor bigger than 1 (e.g. 1.5 or 2) to make sure you don't reallocate frequently.
  2. Classes allocating memory should also release the memory in their destructor, i.e. you need to implement a destructor. Since this type seems also be copyable but the default generated copy construction and copy assignment does the wrong thing, you need to also define those.
share|improve this answer
    
I got desperate because of those warnings in the build log, so I tried to trace the source with no luck. That's when I added the newsize variable, till then I just used "ptr[units]=pushnum".I just forgot to undo it. Yeah I know. I have quite a lot to learn. I didn't think about that idea. I'll try to add more room per reallocation next time. I did try to make a destructor, and it was working fine for a while. Then i guess i did something somewhere down the line and broke it. If I uncomment it now I'll get a C2039 error in a weird spot(at the end, where there is no code, just the '}'). –  Natriacid Feb 10 '12 at 0:04

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