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I have this:

puts pids
pids.each do |pid|
    puts "Running on pid #{pid}"
    begin
        Process::kill(0, pid)
        puts "Pid #{pid} still alive"
    rescue Errno::ESRCH
        puts "Pid #{pid} now dead!!!!"
        pids.delete(pid)
        running_jobs -= 1
        puts "Remaining jobs: #{running_jobs}"
    end
end

which outputs this:

25555
25579
25616
Running on pid 25555
Pid 25555 now dead!!!!
Remaining jobs: 2
Running on pid 25616
Pid 25616 now dead!!!!
Remaining jobs: 1    

As you can see, the loop is never executed on the middle element. Can anyone tell me why that happens that way? I need to really loop over every item and handle it accordingly.

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2  
You don't want to delete elements in a collection while iterating over that same collection. (I think this is true in general, in most programming languages.) See these posts for other ways to delete selected items from an array in Ruby, in addition to @klochner's post about your specific situation: stackoverflow.com/questions/3260686/… stackoverflow.com/questions/2933366/… –  Telemachus Feb 10 '12 at 0:24
    
For some reason I feel like I've been able to do this in other programs I've written. I will have to give it a try later. I am new to Ruby, so appreciate the help. –  cookiecaper Feb 10 '12 at 0:43
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You are mutating the array as you iterate over it with pids.delete(pid) So you are on 25555 at index 0, then you delete it, causing the array to look like [25579, 25616]. Then you iterate, now you are at index 1, which is 25616. If you simply remove the delete, you will no longer be mutating the array and the iteration will work as expected.

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So your loop is on item 5, for example, and you delete it. Items 6, 7, etc move up 1, and when your loop goes to where item 6 used to be, it finds item 7.

But saying that you can't mutate your array while iterating over it is a bit stodgy. You can keep your code exactly as you have it if you just replace your each with reverse_each. This iterates through the array from end to beginning, so now when you delete item 5 it doesn't matter that 6 moves up, because you're going to 4 next, and that hasn't changed (yet).

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Awesome, solved my issue. –  Nic Jul 30 '12 at 1:22
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You can't mutate the array while iterating over it - just take out this line:

pids.delete(pid)

Judging from your code, you probably want to refactor like this to simulate the delete call:

pids = pids.select do |pid|
  puts "Running on pid #{pid}"
  begin
      Process::kill(0, pid)
      puts "Pid #{pid} still alive"
      true
  rescue Errno::ESRCH
      puts "Pid #{pid} now dead!!!!"
      running_jobs -= 1
      puts "Remaining jobs: #{running_jobs}"
      false
  end
end
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Why would that cause certain items to be skipped? It should only be removing the current pid from the array. I want the array to be an up-to-date list of the pids I am trying to track and I don't want to keep a bunch of dead weight floating around in there. –  cookiecaper Feb 10 '12 at 0:22
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