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This is my current code:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

use strict;
require IO::Socket;

while (<>) {
        chomp(my $host = $_);
        my @header;

        print "Connecting to: $host\n";
        my $socket = new IO::Socket::INET(
                PeerAddr => $host,
                PeerPort => 80,
                Proto => 'tcp') || print "Could not connect: $!\n";

        print "Connected.\n";

        print $socket "GET / HTTP/1.0\n\n";
        my $i = 0;
        while (<$socket>) {
                @header[$i] = $_;
                $i++;
        }

        $i = 0;
        print "--------------------------------------\n";
        while ($i <= 8) {
                print "@header[$i++]";
        }

        print "-------------------------------------\n";
        print "Finished $host\n\n";
}

If while going through a list of IP's, and a host is down, instead of continuing onto the next IP, it will give me an error "Can't use string ("1") as a symbol ref while "strict refs" in use".

If I then change @header[$i] = $; to $header[$i] = $; I also get the same error. How can I make this script better.

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1  
What line is causing the error? Also, you should probably either die or move on to the next argument if the creation of $socket as a new IO::Socket::INET object isn't successful. –  Jack Maney Feb 10 '12 at 0:33
2  
@header[$i] is incorrect even if changing it to the right thing doesn't fix the error. –  Wooble Feb 10 '12 at 0:35
1  
@Wooble - Good catch. Yet another reason why the warnings pragma should always be enabled. –  Jack Maney Feb 10 '12 at 0:38
    
It says line 18 is causing the error. And @Wooble, I was using die, until I saw the problem that if it finds ANY hosts that are down, it will exit, I need it to carry on, to the next one if a host is down, so I used print. Warnings are enabled #!/usr/bin/perl -w –  Daveid Fred Feb 10 '12 at 0:40
2  
Don't just say "line 18". Say which line that is. Line 18 if I count it out is print $socket ... –  TLP Feb 10 '12 at 0:53

2 Answers 2

The problem is in the way you set $socket:

my $socket = new IO::Socket::INET(
        PeerAddr => $host,
        PeerPort => 80,
        Proto => 'tcp') || print "Could not connect: $!\n";

Since you're using the || operator, which has higher precedence than =, this statement is parsed as

my $socket = (new IO::Socket::INET(...) || print ...);

If new IO::Socket::INET returns a false value (as it does if the connection fails), the print will be executed and its return value (which is normally 1) will be assigned to $socket. When you then try to use $socket as an indirect object in the statement:

print $socket "GET / HTTP/1.0\n\n";

Perl notices that the value 1 is not actually an object reference and throws the error you reported.

If you'd used the low-precedence operator or instead of ||, the value of $socket would've been undef instead of 1, and the error message you'd have received would've been something like Can't use an undefined value as a symbol reference .... Of course, this wouldn't have actually fixed your problem, but at least it might've made it easier to diagnose.

To actually fix the problem, you need to fix your code so that you won't keep executing the rest of the loop body if the connection fails. One way to do that would be like this:

my $socket = new IO::Socket::INET(
        PeerAddr => $host,
        PeerPort => 80,
        Proto => 'tcp');

unless ($socket) {
        print "Could not connect: $!\n";
        next;  # skip the rest of the loop
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 nice catch. `` –  TLP Feb 10 '12 at 2:53

Wouldn't the simple solution be to use the lower precedence version 'or' which has lower precedence than '='?

my $socket = new IO::Socket::INET(
    PeerAddr => $host,
    PeerPort => 80,
    Proto => 'tcp')
        or print "Could not connect: $!\n";

In fact, the operators 'or', and 'xor', have the lowest operator precedence (see perlop).

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