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I want count the characters (in various charsets) in a file and I'm using the function 'mbtowc' to detect the characters. I cannot figure out why the chars and results values are different. Here is my example:

char buf[BUFFER_SIZE + MB_LEN_MAX];

int fd = open ("chinese_test", O_RDONLY);

unsigned int bytes, chars;

int bytes_read;

bytes = chars = 0;

while((bytes_read = read(fd, buf, BUFFER_SIZE)) > 0) {
    wchar_t wc_buf[BUFFER_SIZE], *wcp;
    char *p;
    int n = 0;

    bytes += bytes_read;

    p = buf;
    wcp = wc_buf;

    while((n = mbtowc(wcp, p, MB_LEN_MAX)) > 0) {
        p += n;
        wcp++;

        chars++;
    }

}

printf("chars: %d\tbytes: %d\n", chars, bytes);

I test the function with a text with some GB2312 characters, but chars and bytes are too different values.

My test returns -> chars: 4638 | bytes: 17473 but 'wc' linux command returns: chars: 16770 | bytes: 17473

Why this difference? What did I do wrong?


Now I've this code but there are still soe difference in the result.

char buf[BUFFER_SIZE * MB_LEN_MAX];

int fd = open ("test_chinese", O_RDONLY), filled = 0;

unsigned int bytes, chars;

int bytes_read;

bytes = chars = 0;

while((bytes_read = read(fd, buf, BUFFER_SIZE)) > 0) {
    wchar_t wc_buf[BUFFER_SIZE], *wcp;
    char *p;
    int n = 0;

    bytes += bytes_read;

    p = buf;
    wcp = wc_buf;



    while(bytes_read > 0) {
        n = mbtowc(NULL, p, MB_LEN_MAX);

        if (n <= 0) {
            p++;
            bytes_read--;
            continue;
        }
        p += n;

        bytes_read -= n;

        chars++;
    }

}

printf("\n\nchars: %d\tbytes: %d\n", chars, bytes);
share|improve this question
2  
Depending on you BUFFER_SIZE and the size of the file you read, you might get incomplete multibyte sequences. Add a check after the while loop to see if n is negative to be certain. –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 10 '12 at 1:32
    
@JoachimPileborg, I know this problem. Is it possible that with a file of 17473 Byte and with the BUFFER_SIZE = 1024 are there so many errors? –  Figus Feb 10 '12 at 1:42
    
Probably not, but you should check for this anyway. The most likely culprit is the one pointed out in the answer by Swiss. –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 10 '12 at 1:48
    
On a closer look, your code looks fine except for the issue brought up by Joachim. I think I might know what the issue is though. Could you provide an excerpt from chinese_test? –  Swiss Feb 10 '12 at 1:57
    
@Swiss this is the file: docs.google.com/… –  Figus Feb 10 '12 at 2:21

1 Answer 1

The problem is a combination of your BUFFER_SIZE, the file size of chinese_test and the byte alignment of wchar_t. As proof, try drastically increasing BUFFER_SIZE- you should start getting the answer you want.

What is happening is that your program works for the first block of text that it receives. But think about what happens in your code if a character is split between the first and second blocks as follows:

  | First Block                 | Second Block      |
  | [wchar_t] [wchar_t] ... [wchar_t] [wchar_t] ... |
  | [1,2,3,4] [1,2,3,4] ... [1,2,3,4] [1,2,3,4] ... |

Your code will begin the second block on the 3rd byte in the first character, and that will not be recognized as a valid character. Since mbtowc will return -1 when it does not find a valid character, your loop will immediately end and will count zero characters for that entire block. The same will apply for the following blocks.

EDIT:
Another issue I noticed is that you need to set the locale in order for mbtowc to work correctly. Taking all of these issues into account, I wrote the following which returns the same character count as wc for me:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <locale.h>

int BUFFER_SIZE = 1024;
const char *DEFAULT_F_IN = "chinese_test";

struct counts {
    int bytes;
    int chars;
};

int count_block(struct counts *c, char *buf, int buf_size)
{
    int offset = 0;
    while (offset < buf_size) {
        int n = mbtowc(NULL, buf + offset, MB_CUR_MAX);
        if (n <= 0) {
            break;
        }

        offset += n;
        c->bytes += n;
        c->chars++;
    }

    return buf_size - offset;
}

void get_counts(struct counts *c, FILE *fd)
{
    char buf[BUFFER_SIZE];
    c->bytes = 0;
    c->chars = 0;

    int bytes_read;
    while((bytes_read = fread(buf, sizeof(*buf), BUFFER_SIZE, fd)) > 0) {
        int remaining = count_block(c, buf, bytes_read);
        if (remaining == 0) {
            continue;
        } else if (remaining < MB_CUR_MAX) {
            fseek(fd, -remaining, SEEK_CUR);
        } else {
            perror("Error");
            exit(1);
        }
    }
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    FILE *fd;
    if (argc > 1) {
        fd = fopen(argv[1], "rb");
    } else {
        fd = fopen(DEFAULT_F_IN, "rb");
    }

    setlocale(LC_ALL, "");
    struct counts c;
    get_counts(&c, fd);
    printf("chars: %d\tbytes: %d\n", c.chars, c.bytes);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
mbtowc() returns -1 if there is an incomplete multibyte character. –  caf Feb 10 '12 at 2:46
    
@caf Whoops. Thanks for the catch. I have corrected it now though. –  Swiss Feb 10 '12 at 3:03
    
@Swiss With this while I've chars:16634; but your code raise a segmentation fault while(bytes_read > 0) { n = mbtowc(NULL, p, MB_LEN_MAX); if (n <= 0) { p++; bytes_read--; continue; } p += n; bytes_read -= n; chars++; } –  Figus Feb 10 '12 at 3:09
    
I have updated the code to fix the segfault. By using an offset relative to buf rather than a separate pointer, you can track when you are past the end of the buffer. –  Swiss Feb 10 '12 at 18:25
1  
@Storted: The code sample I provide now completely works for me. Working with Unicode in C is a PITA. –  Swiss Feb 10 '12 at 19:36

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