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Why can you not have a foreign key in a polymorphic association, such as the one represented below as a Rails model?

class Comment < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :commentable, :polymorphic => true
end

class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :comments, :as => :commentable
end

class Photo < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :comments, :as => :commentable
  #...
end

class Event < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :comments, :as => :commentable
end
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1 Answer 1

up vote 70 down vote accepted

A foreign key must reference only one parent table. This is fundamental to both SQL syntax, and relational theory.

A Polymorphic Association is when a given column may reference either of two or more parent tables. There's no way you can declare that constraint in SQL.

The Polymorphic Associations design breaks rules of relational database design. I don't recommend using it.

There are several alternatives:

  • Exclusive Arcs: Create multiple foreign key columns, each referencing one parent. Enforce that exactly one of these foreign keys can be non-NULL.

  • Reverse the Relationship: Use three many-to-many tables, each references Comments and a respective parent.

  • Concrete Supertable: Instead of the implicit "commentable" superclass, create a real table that each of your parent tables references. Then link your Comments to that supertable. Pseudo-rails code would be something like the following (I'm not a Rails user, so treat this as a guideline, not literal code):

    class Commentable < ActiveRecord::Base
      has_many :comments
    end
    
    class Comment < ActiveRecord::Base
      belongs_to :commentable
    end
    
    class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
      belongs_to :commentable
    end
    
    class Photo < ActiveRecord::Base
      belongs_to :commentable
    end
    
    class Event < ActiveRecord::Base
      belongs_to :commentable
    end
    

I also cover polymorphic associations in my presentation Practical Object-Oriented Models in SQL, and my book SQL Antipatterns: Avoiding the Pitfalls of Database Programming.


Re your comment: Yes, I do know that there's another column that notes the name of the table that the foreign key supposedly points to. This design is not supported by foreign keys in SQL.

What happens, for instance, if you insert a Comment and name "Video" as the name of the parent table for that Comment? No table named "Video" exists. Should the insert be aborted with an error? What constraint is being violated? How does the RDBMS know that this column is supposed to name an existing table? How does it handle case-insensitive table names?

Likewise, if you drop the Events table, but you have rows in Comments that indicate Events as their parent, what should be the result? Should the drop table be aborted? Should rows in Comments be orphaned? Should they change to refer to another existing table such as Articles? Do the id values that used to point to Events make any sense when pointing to Articles?

These dilemmas are all due to the fact that Polymorphic Associations depends on using data (i.e. a string value) to refer to metadata (a table name). This is not supported by SQL. Data and metadata are separate.


I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around your "Concrete Supertable" proposal.

  • Define Commentable as a real SQL table, not just an adjective in your Rails model definition. No other columns are necessary.

    CREATE TABLE Commentable (
      id INT AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY
    ) TYPE=InnoDB;
    
  • Define the tables Articles, Photos, and Events as "subclasses" of Commentable, by making their primary key be also a foreign key referencing Commentable.

    CREATE TABLE Articles (
      id INT PRIMARY KEY, -- not auto-increment
      FOREIGN KEY (id) REFERENCES Commentable(id)
    ) TYPE=InnoDB;
    
    -- similar for Photos and Events.
    
  • Define the Comments table with a foreign key to Commentable.

    CREATE TABLE Comments (
      id INT PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT,
      commentable_id INT NOT NULL,
      FOREIGN KEY (commentable_id) REFERENCES Commentable(id)
    ) TYPE=InnoDB;
    
  • When you want to create an Article (for instance), you must create a new row in Commentable too. So too for Photos and Events.

    INSERT INTO Commentable (id) VALUES (DEFAULT); -- generate a new id 1
    INSERT INTO Articles (id, ...) VALUES ( LAST_INSERT_ID(), ... );
    
    INSERT INTO Commentable (id) VALUES (DEFAULT); -- generate a new id 2
    INSERT INTO Photos (id, ...) VALUES ( LAST_INSERT_ID(), ... );
    
    INSERT INTO Commentable (id) VALUES (DEFAULT); -- generate a new id 3
    INSERT INTO Events (id, ...) VALUES ( LAST_INSERT_ID(), ... );
    
  • When you want to create a Comment, use a value that exists in Commentable.

    INSERT INTO Comments (id, commentable_id, ...)
    VALUES (DEFAULT, 2, ...);
    
  • When you want to query comments of a given Photo, do some joins:

    SELECT * FROM Photos p JOIN Commentable t ON (p.id = t.id)
    LEFT OUTER JOIN Comments c ON (t.id = c.commentable_id)
    WHERE p.id = 2;
    

Admittedly, some of these steps break the conventions used by Rails. But the Rails conventions are wrong with respect to proper relational database design.

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1  
Thanks for following up. Just so we're on the same page, in Rails polymorphic associations use two columns in our Comment for the foreign key. One column holds the id of the target row, and the second column tells Active Record which model that key is in (Article, Photo or Event). Knowing this, would you still recommend the three alternatives you have proposed? I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around your "Concrete Supertable" proposal. What do you mean when you say "link your Comments to that supertable" (Commentable)? –  eggdrop May 28 '09 at 18:47
2  
Exactly. It should be a strong "code smell" that it's not correct relational database design when the Polymorphic Associations documentation itself says that you can't use foreign key constraints! –  Bill Karwin May 28 '09 at 22:37
1  
@Mohamad, STI would work fine. You could still define foreign keys if your parent table used STI. Or even if the child table used STI. –  Bill Karwin Jul 24 '13 at 17:03
1  
@antinome, yes, if you create the tables with a real foreign key constraint as I showed, you won't be able to create a row in the Articles table unless the corresponding id exists in the Commentable table. –  Bill Karwin Nov 22 '13 at 19:03
1  
@BillKarwin Your answers are always great, I hope someday close to now to finish your book. –  giannis christofakis Dec 9 '13 at 19:05

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