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I want to compare two lists, based on a filter expression; not sure how to construct the lamda expression for the generic method; Please refer to the code below; or is there an easier way via an intersect in LINQ?

any help would be greatly appreciated.

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Data d1 = new Data {Id = 1, Name = "One"};
            Data d2 = new Data { Id = 2, Name = "Two" };
            Data d3 = new Data { Id = 3, Name = "Three" };

            Data d4 = new Data { Id = 1, Name = "One" };
            Data d5 = new Data { Id = 2, Name = "Two" };
            Data d6 = new Data { Id = 4, Name = "Four" };

            List<Data> original = new List<Data> {d1, d2, d3};
            List<Data> filterItems = new List<Data> {d4, d5, d6};

            List<Data> result = original.FilterDataList(filterItems);

            //How to call this method?
            List<Data> genericCall = original.FilterList<Data>(filterItems, data => data.Id ?????????????)
        }
    }

    public class Data
    {
        public long Id;
        public string Name;
    }

    public static class Extensions
    {
        public static List<Data> FilterDataList(this List<Data> sourceList, List<Data> filterOutItems)
        {
            return sourceList.Where(p => filterOutItems.All(l => l.Id != p.Id)).ToList();
        }

        public static List<T> FilterList<T>(this List<T> sourceList, List<T> filterOutItems, Func<T, bool> filterExpression)
        {
            return sourceList.Where(p => filterOutItems.All(filterExpression)).ToList();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If I understand your question correctly, FilterList is a generic version of FilterDataList where you are passing in the lambda as a parameter. In that case you would call the method as follows:

List<Data> genericCall = original.FilterList<Data>(filterItems, (x, y) => x.Id != y.Id);

If you want to use Except as @ivancho and @perelman have suggested you could use a method like this:

public static class EnumerableExtension
{
    public static IEnumerable<T> Except<T>(this IEnumerable<T> listA, IEnumerable<T> listB,
                                           Func<T, T, bool> lambda)
    {
        return listA.Except(listB, new Comparer<T>(lambda));
    }

    public static IEnumerable<T> Intersect<T>(this IEnumerable<T> listA, IEnumerable<T> listB,
                                              Func<T, T, bool> lambda)
    {
        return listA.Intersect(listB, new Comparer<T>(lambda));
    }
}

You would then call it as follows:

original.Except<Data>(filterItems, (x, y) => x.Id != y.Id);
share|improve this answer
    
Aha!! The Except extension is exactly what I need!!! thanks for that :-) Yes the FilterList is a generic method I was struggling with, the (x, y) => x.Id != y.Id wont work with a Func<T, bool> so thats where I was stuck – Ricky G Feb 10 '12 at 2:43

What is your desired output? Did you try the first result in https://www.google.com/search?q=linq+intersect ? It seems like you should go through the Enumerable documentation - you are using .All where you most likely mean .Any, and just in general it would give you a better idea of what is possible with LINQ.

share|improve this answer

I am not clear what you are trying to do. Your FilterDataList appears to be the same as Except().ToList(). The .Where in your FilterList does not use p (the argument to the lambda), so I am unclear what you want to do with the filter expression. Maybe you are looking for using a different IEqualityComparer with Except() which you would have to define as a separate class.

share|improve this answer

Thanks to everyone for pointing the LINQ Except extension out, here is my end solution

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Data d1 = new Data {Id = 1, Name = "One"};
            Data d2 = new Data { Id = 2, Name = "Two" };
            Data d3 = new Data { Id = 3, Name = "Three" };

            Data d4 = new Data { Id = 1, Name = "One" };
            Data d5 = new Data { Id = 2, Name = "Two" };


            List<Data> original = new List<Data> {d1, d2, d3};
            List<Data> filterItems = new List<Data> {d4, d5, d6};


            List<Data> datas = original.Except(filterItems, (x, y) => x.Id == y.Id).ToList();
        }
    }

    public class Data
    {
        public long Id;
        public string Name;
    }

    public static class EnumerableExtension
    {
        public static IEnumerable<T> Except<T>(this IEnumerable<T> listA, IEnumerable<T> listB,
                                               Func<T, T, bool> lambda)
        {
            return listA.Except(listB, new Comparer<T>(lambda));
        }

        public static IEnumerable<T> Intersect<T>(this IEnumerable<T> listA, IEnumerable<T> listB,
                                                  Func<T, T, bool> lambda)
        {
            return listA.Intersect(listB, new Comparer<T>(lambda));
        }
    }


    public class Comparer<T> : IEqualityComparer<T>
    {
        private readonly Func<T, T, bool> _expression;

        public Comparer(Func<T, T, bool> lambda)
        {
            _expression = lambda;
        }

        public bool Equals(T x, T y)
        {
            return _expression(x, y);
        }

        public int GetHashCode(T obj)
        {
            /*
             If you just return 0 for the hash the Equals comparer will kick in. 
             The underlying evaluation checks the hash and then short circuits the evaluation if it is false.
             Otherwise, it checks the Equals. If you force the hash to be true (by assuming 0 for both objects), 
             you will always fall through to the Equals check which is what we are always going for.
            */
            return 0;
        }
    }


}
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