Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a very simple print program called "print.c":

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void){
        printf("Random words");
}

Compiling with the command gcc -o print print.c causes a completely clean compile and the executable runs as expected.

Compiling with the command gcc -o -std=c99 print print.c gives me:

print: In function `_fini':
(.fini+0x0): multiple definition of `_fini'
/usr/lib/gcc/i686-linux-gnu/4.6.1/../../../i386-linux-gnu/crti.o:(.fini+0x0): first defined here
print: In function `__data_start':
(.data+0x0): multiple definition of `__data_start'
/usr/lib/gcc/i686-linux-gnu/4.6.1/../../../i386-linux-gnu/crt1.o:(.data+0x0): first defined here
print: In function `__data_start':
(.data+0x4): multiple definition of `__dso_handle'
/usr/lib/gcc/i686-linux-gnu/4.6.1/crtbegin.o:(.data+0x0): first defined here
print:(.rodata+0x4): multiple definition of `_IO_stdin_used'
/usr/lib/gcc/i686-linux-gnu/4.6.1/../../../i386-linux-gnu/crt1.o:(.rodata.cst4+0x0): first defined here
print: In function `_start':
(.text+0x0): multiple definition of `_start'
/usr/lib/gcc/i686-linux-gnu/4.6.1/../../../i386-linux-gnu/crt1.o:(.text+0x0): first defined here
print:(.rodata+0x0): multiple definition of `_fp_hw'
/usr/lib/gcc/i686-linux-gnu/4.6.1/../../../i386-linux-gnu/crt1.o:(.rodata+0x0): first defined here
print: In function `_init':
(.init+0x0): multiple definition of `_init'
/usr/lib/gcc/i686-linux-gnu/4.6.1/../../../i386-linux-gnu/crti.o:(.init+0x0): first defined here
/tmp/ccfvqWMW.o: In function `main':
print.c:(.text+0x0): multiple definition of `main'
print:(.text+0xb4): first defined here
/usr/lib/gcc/i686-linux-gnu/4.6.1/crtend.o:(.dtors+0x0): multiple definition of `__DTOR_END__'
print:(.dtors+0x4): first defined here
/usr/bin/ld: error in print(.eh_frame); no .eh_frame_hdr table will be created.
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status

Does anyone know how to fix this?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Your print isn't being interpreted as the argument to the -o option, so it's trying to relink your print executable from the first compilation. This includes numerous symbols that duplicate other symbols it's trying to link, hence the errors.

Try instead:

gcc -std=c99 -o print print.c

or better yet:

gcc -std=c99 -Wall -g -O -o print print.c
share|improve this answer
    
s/isn't/is/ and you're good. –  Richard Pennington Feb 10 '12 at 2:41
    
@RichardPennington: The OP wants the print to be interpreted as the argument to -o (the output filename), but it's not - so it's being interpreted as an input file instead. –  caf Feb 10 '12 at 2:48
    
@cat My mistake. –  Richard Pennington Feb 10 '12 at 2:53
add comment

The command should be gcc -o print -std=c99 print.c The -o parameter specifies that the next token is the output file.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, that fixed it . Sorry about that, I'm pretty new to C –  user1201101 Feb 10 '12 at 2:40
add comment

Use this command line:

gcc -o print -std=c99  print.c
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.