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I have been introduced to xpath today and it seems to be very powerful but after quite a bit of searching, I haven't found how to retrieve siblings (via following-sibling and preceding-sibling) when contains is being used:

text = """
<html>
  <head>
    <title>This tag includes 'some_text'</title>
    <h2>A h2 tag</h2>
  </head>
</html>
"""

import lxml.html
doc = lxml.html.fromstring(text)
a = doc.xpath("//*[contains(text(),'some_text')]/following-sibling::*")

which produces []. Of course, the result I expect is to get the h2 tag.

However, using *[contains(text(),'name')] retrieves as expected, the title element. In the same manner, if instead of using following-sibling axis (I think that's how it's called), I use //parent::*, also works.

So, How can I get the siblings under that condition?

Thanks in advance.

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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Funny html sample you have.

import lxml

text = """                                                       
<html>
  <body>
    <span>This tag includes 'some_text'</span>
    <h2>A h2 tag</h2>
  </body>
</html>
"""

doc = lxml.etree.fromstring(text, parser=lxml.etree.HTMLParser())
doc.xpath("//*[contains(text(),'some_text')]/following-sibling::*")
# [<Element h2 at 102eee100>]

doc = lxml.html.fromstring(text)
doc.xpath("//*[contains(text(),'some_text')]/following-sibling::*")
# [<Element h2 at 102f6f188>]

UPDATE:

Here I don't use html parser with its validation rules, and treat input as just random xml:

text = """                       
<html>
  <head>
    <title>This tag includes 'some_text'</title>
    <h2>A h2 tag</h2>
  </head>
</html>
"""
doc = lxml.etree.fromstring(text)
doc.xpath("//*[contains(text(),'some_text')]/following-sibling::*[1]")
# [<Element h2 at 102eeef70>]
share|improve this answer
    
Now I see that my problem relies on having <head></head> without <body></body>. Since you changed it for body tags, everything works great. Frankly, I don't know what to make of those changes. –  Robert Smith Feb 10 '12 at 3:41
    
By the way, another problem could be having <title></title> within <head></head>, but this is really weird because <title> in <head> is allowed, isn't it? (w3schools.com/tags/tag_title.asp) –  Robert Smith Feb 10 '12 at 3:44
    
@RobertSmith, your html is kind of fine, you don't have to change it. See my updated answer. –  Misha Akovantsev Feb 10 '12 at 4:06
    
Oh, thank you very much. I really need to take a look at lxml. Using lxml.etree.fromstring(text) as you did, avoids any parsing (I hope), but lxml.html.fromstring(text) do the parsing. –  Robert Smith Feb 10 '12 at 4:20
    
@RobertSmith, I am guessing that lxml.html.fromstring(text) is a shortcut for lxml.etree.fromstring(text, parser=lxml.etree.HTMLParser()). And the bottom line of this page is: "your xpath expression was correct from the very beginning". –  Misha Akovantsev Feb 10 '12 at 4:31
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There are a few things that need to be clarified before answering this:

  1. following-sibling will return ALL following siblings, not just the immediate one. So if there are nodes after the then they will also be returned.
  2. HTML is not XML. While LXML will try and clean the source up for you, if you can't trust the incoming HTML is clean, then your XPaths may fail. Eg. I believe title tags don't need closing tags in HTML, so depending on how broken the source is LXML may incorrectly put the as a child of the , which may break the XPath
  3. Titles can't have child elements, which may influence how LXML is cleaning it up (such as adding a body tag between them, etc...).

Testing this in an XML editor shows your XPath is valid, but i was getting the lack of elements when testing in LXML, which may mean that it is changing the XML some how (but I didn't check).

I would recommend rethinking if XPath is the tool for this job, especially if you are trying to use it for scaping of web pages or similar.

You might also think about rewriting the XPath statement so it is a little more readable as well.

//*[contains(text(),'some_text')]/following-sibling::*

This says: Find me any element that has "some text" in the text, then get the next its following siblings.

//*[preceding-sibling::*[position()=1 and contains(text(),'some_text') and ]]

Whereas this says: Find me the element whose first previous sibling has text that contains "some text".

This may be a style issue, but I find the latter more readable.

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and what about //*[contains(text(),'some_text')]/following-sibling::*[1]? The initial html didn't work, because lxml parser added <body> to it and moved <h2> there, leaving <title> alone in the <head> without any siblings. –  Misha Akovantsev Feb 10 '12 at 3:17
    
Oh, I didn't know lxml was changing the source. I don't feel that's desirable. All I want is get the node which contains 'some_text' and traverse the tree a bit. Maybe lxml is not the right tool for the job, although I don't expect to be dealing with HTML so broken, but it's good to know. Is there a better solution to parse in this way but without these issues? –  Robert Smith Feb 10 '12 at 3:37
    
@MishaAkovantsev By the way, thanks for the clarification. That explains why other markups are working but mine is not. –  Robert Smith Feb 10 '12 at 3:38
    
@Robert Smith LXML changes the HTML as it is trying to make 'valid' HTML from the source and having a <h2> in the <head> or <title > isn't valid. Depending on what you are trying to do, BeautifulSoup may also be an option, but if you have control over the incoming source LXML should work fine. –  Lego Stormtroopr Feb 10 '12 at 3:45
    
@LegoStormtroopr Now I see. But I thought <title> is valid (w3schools.com/tags/tag_title.asp). Isn't it?. BeautifulSoup works great but I didn't find support for xpath, and I need to be able to match attributes and TextNodes and traverse the tree from there. I think that's not possible without xpath. –  Robert Smith Feb 10 '12 at 3:54
show 2 more comments
<?xml version="1.0" ?>
  <html>
    <head>
      <title>This tag includes 'some_text'</title>
      <h2>A h2 tag</h2>
    </head>
  </html>
//*[contains(text(),'some_text')]/following-sibling::*
Array
(
    [0] => SimpleXMLElement Object
        (
            [0] => A h2 tag
        )

)

I used PHP SimpleXMLElement, but the xpath should be the same.

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Uhm, isn't it exactly the same I was using: //*[contains(text(),'some_text')]/following-sibling::*? –  Robert Smith Feb 10 '12 at 3:23
    
Hey, I guess you're right. I ran it through some tests on another piece of XML and worked my way back to your XML and came up with the same string you did, but it worked for me. Probably because I was treating it as XML, not HTML and didn't have the LXML issue that StormTrooper and others mentioned. (I wouldn't have realized that myself. Just started using xpath this week and don't code in py) –  TecBrat Feb 10 '12 at 3:56
    
Probably that's true. The xml tag made all the difference. Thanks! –  Robert Smith Feb 10 '12 at 4:15
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The key thing here is that your XPath is looking at a tree created by an HTML5 parser, not an XML parser. HTML5 parsers create nodes in the tree that are not explicit in your source: in effect, they repair invalid HTML and turn it into valid HTML. This affects any attempt to navigate an HTML tree, whether you use XPath, JQuery, or direct DOM APIs.

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