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This is a homework assignment and I am trying to program an interest calculator. I am required to use the BigDecimal class but cannot figure out how to make the output in currency or percent. I am not exactly sure what questions to ask but I am going to post both codes the BigDecimal class code and the other which displays the output the way I need it but is not using BigDecimal. Any suggestions appreciated.

   import java.util.Scanner;

   import java.math.*;

   public class project3a 
   {


         public static void main(String[] args)
         {   
            System.out.println("Welcome to the interest calculator");   
            System.out.println();


            // create a scanner object and start while loop             
            Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
            String choice ="y";
            while (choice.equalsIgnoreCase("y"))
           {

             //Get input from user
             System.out.print("Enter Loan amount: ");
             double Loanamount = sc.nextDouble();

             System.out.print("Enter Interest Rate: ");
             double interestrate = sc.nextDouble();

             //calculate results    
             double Interest = Loanamount * interestrate;

            //format 
            BigDecimal decimalLoanamount = new BigDecimal(Double.toString (Loanamount));
            decimalLoanamount = decimalLoanamount.setScale(2, RoundingMode.HALF_UP);
            BigDecimal decimalinterestrate = new BigDecimal(Double.toString(interestrate));
            BigDecimal decimalInterest = new BigDecimal (Double.toString(Interest));
            decimalInterest = decimalInterest.setScale(2,RoundingMode.HALF_UP);

            //Display results
            System.out.println("Loan amount: " + decimalLoanamount);
            System.out.println("Interest rate: " + decimalinterestrate);
            System.out.println("Interest:" + decimalInterest);  
            System.out.println();

            //see if user wants to continue             
            System.out.print("Continue? (y/n): ");
            choice = sc.next();
            System.out.println();


         }

    }

    }

    import java.util.Scanner;
    import java.text.NumberFormat;
    import java.math.*;

    public class project3a 
    {


    public static void main(String[] args)
    {   
        System.out.println("Welcome to the interest calculator");   
        System.out.println();


        // create a scanner object and start while loop             
        Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
        String choice ="y";
        while (choice.equalsIgnoreCase("y"))
        {

            //Get input from user
            System.out.print("Enter Loan amount: ");
            double Loanamount = sc.nextDouble();

            System.out.print("Enter Interest Rate: ");
            double interestrate = sc.nextDouble();

            //calculate results 
            double Interest = Loanamount * interestrate;

            //format and display results
            NumberFormat currency = NumberFormat.getCurrencyInstance();
            NumberFormat percent = NumberFormat.getPercentInstance();
            String message =
                "Loan amount:   " + currency.format (Loanamount) + "\n"
              + "Interest rate: " + percent.format (interestrate)+ "\n"
              + "Interest:      " + currency.format (Interest) + "\n";

            System.out.println(message);

            //see if user wants to continue             
            System.out.print("Continue? (y/n): ");
            choice = sc.next();
            System.out.println();


         }

    }

    }
share|improve this question
3  
The less code there is, the better the question, and the faster and better the answer. –  Christian Jonassen Feb 10 '12 at 2:40
2  
I was just trying to show that I was putting in effort and not just fishing for answers, since this is homework. –  Brad White Feb 10 '12 at 2:52
1  
Can you be more specific in what output you expected and what are you getting? Is currency.format() and percent.format() your problem? –  Sérgio Michels Feb 10 '12 at 2:58
    
@BradWhite well, that is good. :) But adding the homework tag and explaining what you have done, and in general being as specific as possible, is really the way to go. –  Christian Jonassen Feb 10 '12 at 3:04
    
When I use the currecy.format() and percent.format() the was exactly how I needed it to be. But then I realized I needed to use the BigDecimal class in my code and now I'm not sure how to display in the currecy.format() or percent.format(). –  Brad White Feb 10 '12 at 3:04

1 Answer 1

up vote -1 down vote accepted

BigDecimal have the method doubleValue() that you can use in NumberFormat.

BigDecimal bd = new BigDecimal("15.25");
NumberFormat currency = NumberFormat.getCurrencyInstance();
NumberFormat percent = NumberFormat.getPercentInstance();

System.out.println( currency.format( bd.doubleValue() ) ); //In Brazil outputs R$ 15,25
System.out.println( percent.format( bd.doubleValue() ) ); // 1.525%
share|improve this answer
    
If you want to use a non-floating point representation to avoid floating errors, you shouldn't reintroduce floating point representation errors at the end by converting to a double. javaworld.com/javaworld/jw-06-2001/jw-0601-cents.html says "Therefore, you cannot rely upon NumericFormat to produce accurate results with very large numbers (about 13 or more digits)." –  Mike Samuel Feb 10 '12 at 3:40
    
@MikeSamuel thanks for the link, interesting point! –  Sérgio Michels Feb 10 '12 at 3:48
    
BigDecimal.format(Object,...) does not have the same caveat about converting BigDecimal to double the way NumberFormat does. –  Mike Samuel Feb 10 '12 at 3:53
    
I really appreiciate all the input. I was able to make it work. Thank you so much –  Brad White Feb 10 '12 at 4:19
    
@BradWhite if Sergio's answer has helped you in answering your question you ought to click on the tick underneath the answer to signify that your question was solved by this answer. –  blahman Feb 10 '12 at 4:59

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