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I'm fairly new to C++ and don't quite understand function parameters with pointers and references. I have an array of Cards that I want to shuffle using the Fisher-Yates shuffle. The deck is declared as

Card *deck[deckSize];

where deckSize has been declared as 24. The array is then initialized. I then call the shuffle function:

void shuffle (Card * deck[]) {
    int deckSize = 24;
    while (deckSize > 1) {
       long int k = lrand48();
       k = k %24;
       deckSize--;
       Card * temp = deck[deckSize];
       deck[deckSize] = deck[k];
       deck[k] = temp;
    }
}

If I try to print the value of a card after calling the shuffle function I get a seg fault. Any pointers on how to do this properly?

share|improve this question
    
what is temp in this line: deck[k] = temp;? –  z - May 28 '09 at 17:47
    
Looks like you're missing a "Card *temp = deck[deckSize]" right after "deckSize--". Is that a copy+paste error, or is that line actually missing from your code? –  Adam Rosenfield May 28 '09 at 17:47
1  
I do not see anything wrong with that code at all. I presume the problem is with printing the value of the card or initialization of the array. You should post code for those. –  TrayMan May 28 '09 at 18:45

10 Answers 10

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It looks that your problem does not come from the code posted, which looks fine at a first glance, but from the code around it.

What about using a standard container of cards ? You must fill it, print it first to see if it's ok, shuffle, and then print it again.

#include <vector>
std::vector<Card> deck; // Empty for now. Must be filled with cards.


void shuffle (std::vector<Card> & deck)
{
    int deckSize = 24;
    while (deckSize > 1) 
    {
       long int k = lrand48();
       k = k %24;
       deckSize--;
       Card temp = deck[deckSize];
       deck[deckSize] = deck[k];
       deck[k] = temp;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Just use std::random_shuffle found in <algorithm>, like this:

std::random_shuffle(deck, deck + deckSize);

and your deck with be shuffled.

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My C/C++ is rusty but I think your declaration:

Card *deck[deckSize];

is declaring an array of POINTERS to Cards. Don't you want this?

Card deck[deckSize];

and then declare shuffle:

void shuffle (Card deck[])

keep in mind arrays are 0-indexed. Not sure if you'd ever access the 24th element but that would be a boo-boo.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't believe Card deck[deckSize]; is valid C++. –  Alan May 28 '09 at 17:51
    
Unless deckSize is a constant. –  Alan May 28 '09 at 17:51
    
Oops - I assumed deckSize was a constant. ASSuME :) –  n8wrl May 28 '09 at 17:52
    
Fair enuff; removed the -1 :D –  Alan May 28 '09 at 17:54
2  
Shuffling pointers is probably what you want to do here. If the card objects are large, or have a complicated copy constructor, doing a copy could be very expensive. –  Dolphin May 28 '09 at 18:53

You could also use

std::random_shuffle(deck, deck + deckSize)

which does Fisher-Yates for you.

However, there probably aren't enough bits in the standard random libraries to genuinely choose from all possible random permutations of cards.

share|improve this answer
 Card *deck[deckSize];

I think you want:

Card *deck = new Card[deckSize];
share|improve this answer
    
deckSize is a conpile-time constant, so `Card * deck[deckSize]' is perfectly fine, and preferable to dynamic allocation. –  Marc Mutz - mmutz Jul 27 '09 at 5:04
    
No, you're wrong. You assume it's a compile time constant, but you can't be certain. Is the cat alive or is the cat dead? –  Alan Jul 28 '09 at 16:30

One immediate nitpick, you should always use the top-half of a random number because most implementations of random numbers have poorer randomness on the bottom half. So if long's are 32 bit you could use: k = (k >> 24) % 24 to get better randomness.

Second, the problem here is you are not setting temp. Your code should have a line: temp = deck[deckSize];.

Hope this helps.

Edit:

Further nitpick, your random number generator is also not big enough to sufficiently shuffle a deck of cards regardless of using the high bit or low bit. It only has 48bit long sequence, but to shuffle a deck you'd need at least a 226bit long sequence (52!, the number of ways to shuffle a deck, is a 226bit long number).

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re: random numbers. This sound like pretty marginal advise at best. –  Trent May 28 '09 at 17:54
    
Sorry, it probably doesn't matter if you are playing against a human, but if you are doing simulations, your results will not be reliable at all. He did not state which was the case. –  Adam Luter May 28 '09 at 17:58
    
The advice about the range of the random number generator are valid. As stated, it doesn't matter if you're just playing cards, but if the shuffle is being used to determine who gets into a better school and who doesn't (I speak from experience here), then you have to ask yourself: is this fair? As an aside, you would probably not want to do k = (k >> 24) % 24 - that would leave you with a severly limited random number generator. (of range [0,23] –  Thanatos May 28 '09 at 19:44
    
That's true, it would be best to skip Fisher-Yates all-together and use a 226bit random number to generate the nth-permutation of the deck. If you only need to shuffle a small number of times using the lrand48() call 5 times to generate the larger number would be fine enough. Course nothing's easy with these darn random numbers -- and also, these are all just nitpicks :) . –  Adam Luter May 29 '09 at 16:08
    
Here is an example for generating the nth permutation: tafakuri.net/?p=68 –  Adam Luter May 29 '09 at 16:19

You declared deck as an array of pointers but you didn't allocate any space for it. If you de-reference it without allocating space you will get a seg-fault.

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he said that its initialized in his question –  z - May 28 '09 at 17:50
    
@yz I'm, not sure someone who doesn't "quite understand function parameters with pointers and references" realizes that allocating space for a pointer is part of "initializing" it. –  Trent May 28 '09 at 17:52
    
I loop through the array and initialize each Card with "deck[i] = new Card()". Is that sufficient for allocating space for it? –  Everett May 28 '09 at 18:07
    
@Everett yes, that is fine. but as n8wrl has pointed out in his answer: you probably don't want an array of pointers to begin with. Possibly a pointer to an array: Card (* deck)[deckSize] –  Trent May 28 '09 at 18:35

I think it might help to see the calling code.


class Card{
public:
    Card(int number):number_(number){}
    int getNumber(){return number_;}
 // ...
private:
    int number_;
};

void shuffle (Card * deck[]) {
    int deckSize = 24;
    while (deckSize > 1) {
       long int k = lrand48();
       k = k %24;
       deckSize--;
       Card * temp = deck[deckSize];
       deck[deckSize] = deck[k];
       deck[k] = temp;
    }
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[]){
{

  const int deckSize=24;
  Card* deck[deckSize];
  for(int i = 0 ; i getNumber()

That should work just fine.

share|improve this answer

Basic arrays can't be defined with variable passed as size, as mentioned above.

And be careful there. Last element of

typename array[SIZE];

is array[SIZE-1], not array[SIZE]. It's probably where you getting a segfault.

You really should at lest try to use STL containers. STL has shuffle algorithms too (:

share|improve this answer

People are complaining that you're not using containers and not declaring the size of your array. Don't worry about that, that's not the problem. Someone also said you're going past array boundaries, which you aren't. It's okay to have arrays with size not declared. It's also okay to have an array of pointers to Card. But the thing I don't get is why it crashes. Here's some sample code I wrote, based on your code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#define DECK_SIZE 24
void shuffle(int deck[]) {
    int n = DECK_SIZE, t;
    while (n > 1) {
        long k = lrand48() % DECK_SIZE;
        n--;
        t = deck[n];
        deck[n] = deck[k];
        deck[k] = t;
    }
}
int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    int deck[DECK_SIZE], i;
    for (i = 0; i < DECK_SIZE; ++i)
        deck[i] = i + 1;
    shuffle(deck);
    for (i = 0; i < DECK_SIZE; ++i)
        printf("%i\n", deck[i]);
    return 0;
}

Run it, it works perfectly fine. That means there is something else going on. Try printing the value of all the cards in your deck before you call shuffle to see if it segfaults there too, I suspect it would.

However, there IS an error in your code. Your function does not shuffle correctly. The correct way to shuffle is not to swap each card with a card selected from the entire deck, but to swap each card at position N with an card selected from the range 0..N. If you swapped each card with a random card you get N^N possible outcomes, some of which overlap if you swap a card back to its original place. With a 3 card deck it's apparent that this is wrong because you will end up with 27 different shuffles, some of which are the same, even though there are 3!=6 permutations of 3 cards. The problem is that since 6 is not a factor of 27, some permutations are more likely than others. To avoid this, try doing it this way:

void shuffle_correctly(int deck[]) {
    int i, t, k;
    for (i = 2; i < DECK_SIZE; ++i) {
        k = lrand48() % i;
        t = deck[i-1];
        deck[i-1] = deck[k];
        deck[k] = t;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Dietrick, I believe your routine and his are equivalent, but start at opposite ends of the array. Note that your "i" monotonically increases from 2 to DECK_SIZE. And his "n" monotonically decreases from DECK_SIZE down to 2. Both are Fisher-Yates. –  Adam Luter May 29 '09 at 16:12
    
Oh my mistake, he should call lrand48() % n as you correctly point out. However, this does mean both of your routines are quite different. I feel certain that his (with the adjustment above) is Fisher-Yates (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fisher-Yates_shuffle). However, I believe yours is not. You shuffle the current place with a random card up to the current place. Which means a card may move more than once. In Fisher-Yates it may only move once. –  Adam Luter May 29 '09 at 16:16

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