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I've got a function that often throws an exception (SSH over 3g).

I'd like to keep trying to run function() every 10 seconds until it succeeds (doesn't throw an exception).

As I see it, there are two options:

Nesting:

def nestwrapper():
    try:
        output = function()
    except SSHException as e:
        # Try again
        sleep(10)
        return nestwrapper()
    return output

Looping: (updated)

It's been pointed out that the previous looping code was pretty unnecessary.

def loopwrapper():
    while True:
        try:
            return function()
        except SSHException as e:
            sleep(10)

Is there a preferred method of doing this?

Is there an issue with nesting and the exception stack?

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would find a loop to be cleaner and more efficient here. If this is an automation job, the recursive method could hit python recursion limit (default is 1000 iirc, can check with sys.getrecursionlimit()).

Don't use status is False for your expression, because this is an identity comparison. Use while not status.

I would probably implement it slightly differently too, because I don't see any need for the two different functions here:

def function_with_retries():
  while True:
    try:
      output = function()
    except SSHException:
      sleep(10)
    else:
      return output
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Thanks for the info on sys.getrecursionlimit()! –  Alex L Feb 10 '12 at 5:04
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I'm not sure it makes a heck of a lot of sense to specially wrap the function call twice. the exception is probably reasonable, and you're going to the extra step of retrying on that particular exception. What I mean is that the try/except is rather tightly involved with the retrying loop.

This is the way I normally do this:

def retry_something():
    while True:
        try:
            return something()
        except SomeSpecialError:
            sleep(10)

The while True: is really exactly what you're up to, you're going to loop forever, or rather, until you actually manage to something(), and then return. There's no further need for a boolean flag of success, that's indicated by the normal case of the return statement (which politely escapes the loop).

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Keep it simple.

function looper(f):
    while 1:
        try:
            return f()
        except SSHException, e:
            sleep(10)

output = looper(<function to call>)
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The preferred way to get the handle to the exception instance is with the as keyword: except Exception as inst. I guess this is to avoid confusion of the syntax for checking multiple exception types in a tuple. –  wim Feb 10 '12 at 4:51
    
@wim I agree, as is more Pythonic, I cut and pasted from the original question. –  ironchefpython Feb 10 '12 at 4:57
    
@wim You're right, as of PEP 3110 (since 2.6). Cheers! –  Alex L Feb 10 '12 at 5:02
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