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I have an algorithm to test for primality, which uses the naive implementation as listed here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Primality_test#Naive_methods

       static boolean check(int n)
   {
           if(n == 2 || n == 3)
           {
                   return true;
           }
           if(n < 2 || n % 2 == 0 || n % 3 == 0)
           {
                   return false;
           }
           for(int i = 6; i * i <= n; i += 6)
           {
                   if(n % (i - 1) == 0 || n % (i + 1) == 0)
                   {
                           return false;
                   }
           }
           return true;
   }

I got all the way to the 6k+1 section, but after that, I'm lost. How else can I further optimize this for speed?

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I think this belongs to codereview, similiar question codereview.stackexchange.com/q/8667/9534 –  bamboon Feb 10 '12 at 5:57
    
Its worth remembering that most numbers will be eliminated by the n % 2 and n % 3 checks so what you do after than is less important. The simplest way to optimise this pattern is to change the way you call it. i.e. optimise the caller as well. –  Peter Lawrey Feb 10 '12 at 8:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you want to stick with the naive method, then your next step is to use the next property listed in the wikipedia page you link to:

So all prime numbers are of the form 30k + i for i = 1, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29 (i.e. for i < 30 such that gcd(i,30) = 1).

Except you might pick slightly different / more primes than 2.3.5

You would replace the 6 stepping loop with a 30 stepping loop, (and check with all primes less than 30 by hand )

The code might look like this:

    static boolean check(int n)
   {
           if(n<30)
           {
              return n==2 || n==3 || n==5 || n==7 || ...
           }

           for(int i = 30; i * i <= n; i += 30)
           {
              if (n % (i + 1))==0 return false;
              if (n % (i + 7))==0 return false;
              if (n % (i + 11))==0 return false;
              if (n % (i + 13))==0 return false;
              if (n % (i + 17))==0 return false;
              if (n % (i + 19))==0 return false;
              if (n % (i + 23))==0 return false;
              if (n % (i + 29))==0 return false;
           }
           return true;
   }

However you'll note that this scans 8/30 (=27%) numbers, while the 6 stepping loop scans 2/6 (=33%) So it scans about 20% less numbers, so you'd expect a speed up of at best 20%. As you add more primes to the list you get diminishing returns.

Really if you need fast prime checking then you need to move away from the naive methods. And there's been plenty of questions about those on stack overflow previously.

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You missed 17. It's 8/30 = 26.(6)%. The speedup is smaller on average because most numbers are already caught by 2 and 3. –  Daniel Fischer Feb 24 '12 at 4:40
    
@DanielFischer Oops - how embarasing. Fixed it now. –  Michael Anderson Feb 24 '12 at 4:54

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