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I am loading some data into a relational database but my colleague and I are having a debate on which format follows the relational theory and standards. Since we are not experts, we would like to have some expert opinion.

(1) The first format:

Region Time   Variable       Value

  1      1      GDP      -0.46113508
  1      2      GDP       0.72478547
  1      3      GDP       0.66753244
  1      1      GNP       1.07924683
  1      2      GNP      -0.45020407
  1      3      GNP       0.25669344
  2      1      GDP       1.00576177
  2      2      GDP      -0.21365634
  2      3      GDP      -0.47925263
  2      1      GNP      -1.27190722
  2      2      GNP      -0.26071341
  2      3      GNP      -0.91423615
  3      1      GDP      -1.32393360
  3      2      GDP      -1.13996826
  3      3      GDP      -2.16641876
  3      1      GNP       1.19636349
  3      2      GNP      -0.22511481
  3      3      GNP       0.49509021
  4      1      GDP      -0.85892203
  4      2      GDP      -0.46614367
  4      3      GDP       0.81645666
  4      1      GNP      -0.45178976
  4      2      GNP       0.41263984
  4      3      GNP       0.26416377
  5      1      GDP       0.40089081
  5      2      GDP       0.14561550
  5      3      GDP       0.52636087
  5      1      GNP       0.64368706
  5      2      GNP       1.22117207
  5      3      GNP       0.06021922

(2) The second format:

Region Time        GDP         GNP

  1    1 -0.4611351  1.07924683
  1    2  0.7247855 -0.45020407
  1    3  0.6675324  0.25669344
  2    1  1.0057618 -1.27190722
  2    2 -0.2136563 -0.26071341
  2    3 -0.4792526 -0.91423615
  3    1 -1.3239336  1.19636349
  3    2 -1.1399683 -0.22511481
  3    3 -2.1664188  0.49509021
  4    1 -0.8589220 -0.45178976
  4    2 -0.4661437  0.41263984
  4    3  0.8164567  0.26416377
  5    1  0.4008908  0.64368706
  5    2  0.1456155  1.22117207
  5    3  0.5263609  0.06021922

Can someone please advice on which format is better ideally with support and reasoning with reference to data structure standards and theory.

Thanks in advance!

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Michael Petrotta, bluefeet, joran, Michael Berkowski, Leon Bambrick Mar 31 at 5:35

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
More information is needed for an objectively correct answer. How do you want to use this data? How will the data change in the future? –  Alec Gorge Feb 10 '12 at 4:47
3  
It's difficult to say without context. The first format is futureproof, supporting any number of variable values. The second format takes less space, but can make supporting additional variable's problematic (most databases support a maximum of ~1,000 columns). What's ideal depends entirely on the business rules of the system you are modeling. –  OMG Ponies Feb 10 '12 at 4:51
    
If GDP and GNP are gross national product and gross national income I prefer the second layout. I do not want to have to query the database twice to get the information for the same region and time. –  Steve Wellens Feb 10 '12 at 5:08
    
Thank you guys for the feed back. There is a possibility of change in the number of regions, while the years and the number of variables will certainly expand. My question is more specifically related to which standard is more acceptable in practice (or recommended) and coherent with the theory. Since both format are relatively similar in terms of performance/efficiency with respect to our tasks, so we want to choose the format that will allow easy integration with other database and systems. looking for extensibility/flexibility and compatibility. Thanks again! –  MKao Feb 10 '12 at 5:12
    
Hi Steven, Yes, most of our data are economic indicators. However, I think in both cases the query are both quite straight forward. It's just a matter of switching the desired column between the SELECT clause or the WHERE clause. Thanks anyway. –  MKao Feb 10 '12 at 5:15

1 Answer 1

The second. The first is an implementation of the EAV anti-pattern.

To see why the first table is a problem, imagine that we don't know anything about the problem domain. We just know that there are currently two different kinds of floating-point values, labeled GDP and GNP, and that we want to add a third, PWT, and the values of PWT are known to be limited to the range

  • 0.0 < PWT <= 1500.0

Adding that data to the first table is simple. Adding that constraint to the first table, that PWT must be between 0 and 1500, is a different story.

Adding a column to the second table is also simple. And adding a check constraint to guarantee the values are in the right range is both simple and easy.

Imagine that we now want to add a fourth kind of value, one that's limited to dollar amounts > 0. How will you manage a fixed-point value in the first table? But adding that column and its constraint are dead simple in the second table.

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