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Has anyone done a proper benchmark on the difference in performance between these three foo functions?

function foo_global() {
}

class SomeClass {
  public function foo_dynamic() {
  }

  public static function foo_static() {
  }
}

To what I know global is fastest and dynamic slowest but I'd appreciate some more learned results.

Thanks

share|improve this question
2  
You should use them for their different purposes, not which is fastest. – alex Feb 10 '12 at 4:51
1  
I certainly hope this is academic curiosity... – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Feb 10 '12 at 4:52
1  
It is interesting none the less, though the above are correct, you should design around readability first. “Premature optimization is the root of all evil” – Ben Feb 10 '12 at 5:08
    
if there was a significant statistical difference, file a bug report. I'm sure the difference pales in comparison to other factors such as Big O algorithm speed of the overall algorithm, not some piddly language syntax. – DGM Feb 10 '12 at 5:14
    
@DGM from my tests, function calls are pretty similar. However inlining short functions can offer substantial improvements. Which is the kind of information that can be gathered from tests like these. – Petah Feb 10 '12 at 5:23
up vote 4 down vote accepted

In my tests the is virtually no difference:

Function call benchmark

So static calls are slightly slower than dynamic, and dynamic is slightly slower than global functions.

<?php
function pre_defined($v1, $v2) {
    return $v1 + $v2;
}
$anonymous = function($v1, $v2) {
    return $v1 + $v2;
};
$create_function = create_function('$v1, $v2', 'return $v1 + $v2;');

class StaticFunction {
    public static function test($v1, $v2) {
        return $v1 + $v2;
    }
}

class DynamicFunction {
    public function test($v1, $v2) {
        return $v1 + $v2;
    }
}
$dynamic = new DynamicFunction();

$v1 = 1;
$v2 = 2;
$iterations = 1000;
Performance\BenchmarkManager::add_group('Function call', new Performance\BenchmarkGroup(array(
    'benchmarks' => array(
        'empty loop' => function() use($iterations, $v1, $v2) {
            for ($i = 0; $i < $iterations; $i++) {
            }
        },
        'native reference point' => function() use($iterations, $v1, $v2) {
            for ($i = 0; $i < $iterations; $i++) {
                $result = $v1 + $v2;
            }
        },
        'pre defined' => function() use($iterations, $v1, $v2) {
            for ($i = 0; $i < $iterations; $i++) {
                $result = pre_defined($v1, $v2);
            }
        },
        'anonymous' => function() use($iterations, $v1, $v2, $anonymous) {
            for ($i = 0; $i < $iterations; $i++) {
                $anonymous($v1, $v2);
            }
        },
        'create_function' => function() use($iterations, $v1, $v2, $create_function) {
            for ($i = 0; $i < $iterations; $i++) {
                $create_function($v1, $v2);
            }
        },
        'eval' => function() use($iterations, $v1, $v2) {
            for ($i = 0; $i < $iterations; $i++) {
                eval('$result = $v1 + $v2;');
            }
        },
        'static' => function() use($iterations, $v1, $v2) {
            for ($i = 0; $i < $iterations; $i++) {
                StaticFunction::test($v1, $v2);
            }
        },
        'dynamic' => function() use($iterations, $v1, $v2, $dynamic) {
            for ($i = 0; $i < $iterations; $i++) {
                $dynamic->test($v1, $v2);
            }
        },
    ),
)));
share|improve this answer
    
Mind linking to that Performance library? BTW, great answer! – Phil Feb 10 '12 at 5:07
    
@Phil sorry, it is one I have created, and is not yet ready for open source. – Petah Feb 10 '12 at 5:08
    
pointless without knowing what the axis is on your chart. – DGM Feb 10 '12 at 5:15
    
@DGM x is time, so each benchmark has been run 14 times. y is iterations, so each benchmark was run y times in 1 second. E.g. the static function got called about 256,000 times per second, over 14 seconds. – Petah Feb 10 '12 at 5:21
    
Thank you for that detailed test and graph. Very nice although it wasn't as intuitive to understand what the axis are. The static vs. dynamic doesn't seem "slightly slower" if you consider it in %. – Collector Feb 11 '12 at 3:24

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