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I am running this command in a script

while [ 1 ]
do

    if [ -e $LOG ]
    then

            grep -A 5 -B 5 -f $PATTERNS $LOG  >> $FOREMAIL
            break
    fi

done

$LOG file is scp'ed from another machine. So as soon as it appears in the current directory, while loop detects it and does the grep. The problem is, the $FOREMAIL file turns up to be empty. But if I run this grep outside of the script as a standalone command with same files and params, I can see that it generates an output.

I am baffled as to why this command is generating no o/p in the script?

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What is the output of your script? While loop needs a sleep inside. –  shiplu.mokadd.im Feb 10 '12 at 5:38
    
What's in $PATTERNS? I'd strongly recommend enclosing it in double quotes, because a typical regex has a gazillion shell metacharacters in it. Look at exactly what command is being executed; the chances are at least moderate that the grep is simply not looking for what you thought it was looking for. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 10 '12 at 7:06
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5 Answers 5

The -e is triggering as soon as scp creates the file, while it still has no data in it, and grep is operating on an empty file. You need to wait until the file has finished transferring.

You could accomplish this by transferring to a temporary filename, than running mv over ssh from the machine which is pushing the file up.

Edit: the code for the machine copying to log file up...

scp $log 192.168.0.1:/logfiles/${log}.tmp
ssh 192.168.0.1 mv /logfiles/${log}.tmp /logfiles/${log}
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Before you can grep, you need to wait for two things: 1) the download started (file comes into existence) and 2) download finished (nobody is opening the file anymore). I have a script call waitfor.sh, which does this:

#!/bin/bash

# waitfor.sh - wait for a file fully downloaded (via Firefox, scp, ...)
# Syntax:
#   waitfor.sh filename

FILENAME=$1 # Name of file to wait for
INTERVAL=10 # Wait interval of N seconds

# Wait for download started
while [ ! -f $FILENAME ] 
do
    sleep $INTERVAL
done

# Wait for download finished
while lsof $FILENAME
do
    sleep $INTERVAL
done

To use it:

waitfor.sh $LOG
grep ...
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Nice use of lsof, thanks. –  abc Feb 10 '12 at 18:43
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Could it be that the while [1] is very fast, so when the file starts copying, it shows up as an empty file first before copying is complete? Depending on the size of the file, try a sleep delay inside the then loop. Figuring out when a file finishes copying when done by an external process is probably a separate question - e.g. googling for something like "how to tell when scp has finshed copying a file" turns up a bunch of links like: http://superuser.com/questions/45224/is-there-a-way-to-tell-if-a-file-is-done-copying

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If you have control over the process that uploads the file, Rophuine's answer below suggesting having that process create the file under a temporary name and then moving it to the final name is better than a sleep. –  Stuart R. Jefferys Feb 10 '12 at 5:14
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Better to use:

if [ -f $LOG ]

instead of:

if [ -e $LOG ]
  • -f checks for a regular type
  • -e checks for any file
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here's what I ended up doing:

scp $LOGFILE

then

scp $SCPDONE # empty file

And modified the if clause like this:

while [ 1 ]
do

    if [ -e $SCPDONE ]
    then

        grep -A 5 -B 5 -f $PATTERNS $LOG  >> $FOREMAIL
        break
    fi

done
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