Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a project that requires different types of iterations. One is function recursion on a char array of 5000. After 50 calls it will crash, assuming from stack overflow. Not sure how to get around this.

void functionLoop(int loopInt)
{
#ifdef ___EXSTR_H___
#undef ___EXSTR_H___
#endif
#include "exstr.h"

    ofstream fout;
    fout.open("output.txt");

    int arrayLength =  sizeof ( example_strings ) / 4; // arrayLength = 5000.
    char *stringArray = example_strings[loopInt];
    int charCount = 0;
    while( *stringArray != 0 )
    {
        stringArray++;
        charCount++;
    }
    cout << loopInt + 1 << ": " << charCount << ": " << example_strings[loopInt] << endl;
    loopInt++;
    if(loopInt < arrayLength)
    {   
        functionLoop(loopInt);      
    }
}

EDIT:

I cleaned up the code a lot, got rid of all the variables, moved the header file to a parameter, and gained about 4500 more iterations, but it's still crashing after 4546. Here's the updated code:

void functionLoop(char * example_strings[], ofstream &outputFile, int counter)
{     
    outputFile << counter + 1 << ": " << strlen(example_strings[counter]) << ": " << example_strings[counter] << endl;
    counter++;

    if(counter < ARRAY_SIZE)
    {   
        functionLoop(example_strings, outputFile, counter);      
    }
}

Thank you to everyone that helped.

share|improve this question
1  
What's that #ifdef, #undef, #endif, #include sequence for? And why are you including a header file inside a function? –  André Caron Feb 10 '12 at 6:09
    
Because I'm not allowed to call it as a global entity. There is 3 other functions that call the same header file, but without undefining it, it would give compile errors. –  Resun Feb 10 '12 at 6:16
    
@Resun I guess your #include "exstr.h" has declaration for example_str which is 5000Bytes long? If so, move the header out. that is the root of your problem :) –  Microkernel Feb 10 '12 at 6:20
    
@Resun: if you intend to use a header file as a form of storage, you should just remove the include guards from exstr.h! Whatever your homework rules are (e.g. don't use global variables and whatenot), that horrible header guard removal will make you lose more points. I used to correct programming homework in introductory classes and that's the kind of stuff I'd remove most points for. It's just not a proper way of using C++. –  André Caron Feb 10 '12 at 6:22
    
@Andre Caron: I tried without it, but since the same header file is being called by three other functions, it would say that example_strings is undefined and wouldn't compile. –  Resun Feb 10 '12 at 6:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Pass the array as a parameter to your function, i.e.

printLoop(outputFile, example_strings, current_index, max_index);
share|improve this answer
    
Duh, I feel like an idiot now. Thanks. –  Resun Feb 10 '12 at 8:18

Here are the bunch of problems I can see in the code.

1) Header file is included with inside the function, so if your header file has some variables/arrays declared in it, (I guess your example_strings is in that header), it will become local variable instance for your function, and will take up stack space. And as you recursion continues, it would soon causes Stack OverFlow.

2) Why are you opening file "output.txt" on every recursive call? So, on each call you are opening same fail again and again. Move it out to somewhere to open it only once.

So, here are my suggestions (brief): 1) Move the header #include "exstr.h" out of your function.

2) Don't open same file on each recursive call.

  • Microkernel
share|improve this answer
    
I have to have the #include in the function. My professor considers calling a local header file a variable, and we aren't allowed to use global local header files. The function writes the length of each array and the string to the file. Since it has to be a recursive function, that's the only way I could figure to do it. –  Resun Feb 10 '12 at 6:21
1  
@Resun What do you mean by calling a header file? You include a header file, not call it. Basically, when compiler see your #include "header_file.h", it just copies the content of header_file.h into that place during compilation. So, #include "" is just a place holder for contents of your header. Also, why are you opening output.txt on every call recursion! its freaking me out :) –  Microkernel Feb 10 '12 at 6:29
1  
@Resun Only way to solve your problem is, make your function iterative or Move your #include"example_header.h" out of your function... Choose one of them and your problem will be solved :) –  Microkernel Feb 10 '12 at 6:30
    
How would I write each string and length to the file on a recursive function if I don't include it each time? The "cout" statement is actually the fout, I just did it that why to see the output on the screen. And thank you for your answers, I'll try it out when I get home –  Resun Feb 10 '12 at 7:28
1  
@Resun: Open the file in main and pass it as a parameter to the function. –  molbdnilo Feb 10 '12 at 7:58

if it is bc you ran out of stack due to recursion, remove the recursive call and use an iterative approach. Its very easy to change your code to do so. make a while/for loop over loopInt and check the length of the string at array[loopInt].

Tip
you can use strlen to find the length of a string, you dont need to do it by hand with that loop: while( *stringArray != 0 )

pseudocode:

i=loopInt
while i<arrayLength {
    print strlen(exampleString[i], exampleString[i])
}

Please edit my post. im on a tablet.

share|improve this answer
    
I have to use recursion, basically it is a program that uses for, while, do-while, and function recursion iterations. Doing the same problem using the different iterations. I have done all the others, but trying to figure out how to run the recursion is a pain due to the stack overflow. As for the length, that is how I have to do it. –  Resun Feb 10 '12 at 6:12
    
@Resun tag your question as homework and use strlen instead of the loop –  Adrian Feb 10 '12 at 6:18

Try:

void functionLoop(int loopInt) 
{ 
#ifdef ___EXSTR_H___ 
#undef ___EXSTR_H___ 
#endif 
#include "exstr.h" 

    ofstream fout; 
    fout.open("output.txt"); 

    int arrayLength =  sizeof ( example_strings ) / 4; // arrayLength = 5000. 
    while (loopInt < arrayLength)
    {
      char *stringArray = example_strings[loopInt]; 
      int charCount = strlen(stringArray);
      stringArray += charCount;
      cout << loopInt + 1 << ": " << charCount << ": " << example_strings[loopInt] << endl; 
      loopInt++; 
    } 
} 
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.