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I am having the following code:

public static IEnumerable<int> GetCloseZipCodes(int zipcode, int radius)
        {
            PycDBDataContext db = new PycDBDataContext();

            ZipCode reqZipInfo = ZipCodes.Instance.zipcodes[zipcode];

            if (reqZipInfo == null)
                return new int[] { };

            double longt = LongitudePlusDistance((double)reqZipInfo.Longitude, (double)reqZipInfo.Latitude, radius);
            double latit = LatitudePlusDistance((double)reqZipInfo.Latitude, radius);
            double minLong = 2 * (double)reqZipInfo.Longitude - longt;
            double minLat = 2 * (double)reqZipInfo.Latitude - latit;

            var zips = ZipCodes.Instance.zipcodes.Where(x => (double)x.Value.Longitude >= minLong &&
                                                  (double)x.Value.Longitude <= longt &&
                                                  (double)x.Value.Latitude >= minLat &&
                                                  (double)x.Value.Latitude <= latit &&
                                                  CalcDistance((double)reqZipInfo.Longitude,
                                                  (double)reqZipInfo.Latitude, 
                                                  (double)x.Value.Longitude, 
                                                  (double)x.Value.Latitude) <= radius).Select(x => x.Key);

            return zips;
        }

This function is given with a zipcode, a radius and it will find all the zipcodes within the radius. I have performance issues here and after running dotTrace most of my time is in the following:

var zips = ZipCodes.Instance.zipcodes.Where(x => (double)x.Value.Longitude >= minLong &&
                                                  (double)x.Value.Longitude <= longt &&
                                                  (double)x.Value.Latitude >= minLat &&
                                                  (double)x.Value.Latitude <= latit &&
                                                  CalcDistance((double)reqZipInfo.Longitude,
                                                  (double)reqZipInfo.Latitude, 
                                                  (double)x.Value.Longitude, 
                                                  (double)x.Value.Latitude) <= radius).Select(x => x.Key);

And third of the time there, it is accessing

public System.Nullable<decimal> Longitude
        {
            get
            {
                return this._Longitude;
            }
            set
            {
                if ((this._Longitude != value))
                {
                    this._Longitude = value;
                }
            }
        }

How can I improve the performance??? We are talking about a few seconds here... I can't understand why. this is all cached and non-SQL.

share|improve this question
    
How many records is it matching against? – Jon Skeet Feb 10 '12 at 7:30
    
My first thought would be that the CalcDistance method is the bottleneck as it's called for every item. Try creating an actual method to replace your lambda expression with and then it will be easier to put some timers around it and further isolate the problem. I don't see anything but that method that could be doing it though. Perhaps you could post the contents of CalcDistance? – Brandon Moore Feb 10 '12 at 7:42
    
If you use the return value of GetCloseZipCodes many times, you can try to convert the it ToList or ToArray, to eliminate multiple calculations. – L.B Feb 10 '12 at 7:48
up vote 3 down vote accepted

For one thing, you're doing a lot of conversions between double and decimal as far as I can see.

I'd suggest either changing your object representation to use double to start with, or convert longt and latit to decimal so that you can perform all the comparisons in a single type, without all the conversions.

Aside from anything else, keeping one consistent representation will leave your code cleaner as well as probably performing better. In this case, I'd say that double is probably a more appropriate representation than decimal anyway - it's not like these are exact decimal values like currency; they're naturally-occurring values which have already been approximated by measurement.

Additionally, you're doing the nullable to non-nullable conversion several times, both for x.Value and for comparisons. Consider using a statement lambda instead:

x => {
   if (x.Longitude == null || x.Latitude == null)
   {
       return false;
   }
   double longitude = x.Value.Longitude.Value;
   double latitude = x.Value.Latitude.Value;
   return longitude >= minLong &&
          longitude <= longt &&
          latitude >= minLat &&
          latitude <= latit &&
          longitude >= minLong &&
          CalcDistance(reqZipInfo.Longitude, reqZipInfo.Latitude,
                       longitude, latitude) <= radius;
}

For the sake of readability, I'd probably put this in a separate method to be honest.

(Do you even need the properties to be nullable, by the way? It doesn't make much sense to me.)

share|improve this answer
    
Do I have to upvote? :P haha btw this answer is so great.... – rofansmanao Feb 10 '12 at 8:52

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