Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to produce a multi-level HTML list from a source array that is formatted like this:

/**
 * id = unique id
 * parent_id = "id" that this item is directly nested under
 * text = the output string
 */
$list = array(
    array(
        'id'        =>  1,
        'parent_id' =>  0,
        'text'      =>  'Level 1',
    ), array(
        'id'        =>  2,
        'parent_id' =>  0,
        'text'      =>  'Level 2',
    ), array(
        'id'        =>  3,
        'parent_id' =>  2,
        'text'      =>  'Level 2.1',
    ), array(
        'id'        =>  4,
        'parent_id' =>  2,
        'text'      =>  'Level 2.2',
    ), array(
        'id'        =>  5,
        'parent_id' =>  4,
        'text'      =>  'Level 2.2.1',
    ), array(
        'id'        =>  6,
        'parent_id' =>  0,
        'text'      =>  'Level 3',
    )
);

The goal is a nested <ul> with an infinite depth. The expected output of the array above is this:

  • Level 1
  • Level 2
    • Level 2.1
    • Level 2.2
      • Level 2.2.1
  • Level 3

If only the array items had a key called child or something that contained the actual sub-array, it would be easy to recurse though these and get the desired output with a function like this:

function makeList($list)
{
    echo '<ul>';
    foreach ($list as $item)
    {
        echo '<li>'.$item['text'];
        if (isset($item['child']))
        {
            makeList($item['child']);
        }
        echo '</li>';
    }
    echo '</ul>';
}

Unfortunately that's not the case for me - the format of the source arrays can't be changed. So, long ago I wrote this very nasty function to make it happen, and it only works up to three levels (code is pasted verbatim with original comments). I know it's a long boring read, please bear with me:

function makeArray($links)
{
    // Output
    $nav = array();

    foreach ($links as $k => $v)
    {
        // If no parent_id is present, we can assume it is a top-level link
        if (empty($v['parent_id']))
        {
            $id = isset($v['id']) ? $v['id'] : $k;

            $nav[$id] = $v;

            // Remove from original array
            unset($links[$k]);
        }
    }

    // Loop through the remaining links again,
    // we can assume they all have a parent_id
    foreach ($links as $k => $v)
    {
        // Link's parent_id is in the top level array, so this is a level-2 link
        // We already looped through every item so we know they are all accounted for
        if (isset($nav[$v['parent_id']]))
        {
            $id = isset($v['id']) ? $v['id'] : $k;

            // Add it to the top level links as a child
            $nav[$v['parent_id']]['child'][$id] = $v;

            // Set a marker so we know which ones to loop through to add the third level
            $nav2[$id] = $v;

            // Remove it from the array
            unset($links[$k]);
        }
    }

    // Last iteration for the third level
    // All other links have been removed from the original array at this point
    foreach ($links as $k => $v)
    {
        $id = isset($v['id']) ? $v['id'] : $k;

        // Link's parent_id is in the second level array, so this is a level-3 link
        // Orphans will be ignored
        if (isset($nav2[$v['parent_id']]))
        {
            // This part is crazy, just go with it
            $nav3 = $nav2[$v['parent_id']]['parent_id'];
            $nav[$nav3]['child'][$v['parent_id']]['child'][] = $v;
        }

    }

    return $nav;
}

This makes an array like:

array(
    'text' => 'Level 1'
    'child' => array(
        array(
            'text' => 'Level 1.2'
            'child' => array(
                array(
                    'text' => 'Level 1.2.1'
                    'child' => array(
                        // etc.
                   ),
                array(
                    'text' => 'Level 1.2.2'
                    'child' => array(
                        // etc.
                   ),
                )
             )
        )
    )
);

Usage:

$nav = makeArray($links);
makeList($nav);

I've spent many spare hours trying to work this out, and the original code which I have given here is still the best solution I've been able to produce.

How can I make this happen without that awful function (which is limited to a depth of 3), and have an infinite number of levels? Is there a more elegant solution to this?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Print:

function printListRecursive(&$list,$parent=0){
    $foundSome = false;
    for( $i=0,$c=count($list);$i<$c;$i++ ){
        if( $list[$i]['parent_id']==$parent ){
            if( $foundSome==false ){
                echo '<ul>';
                $foundSome = true;
            }
            echo '<li>'.$list[$i]['text'].'</li>';
            printListRecursive($list,$list[$i]['id']);
        }
    }
    if( $foundSome ){
        echo '</ul>';
    }
}

printListRecursive($list);

Create multidimensional array:

function makeListRecursive(&$list,$parent=0){
    $result = array();
    for( $i=0,$c=count($list);$i<$c;$i++ ){
        if( $list[$i]['parent_id']==$parent ){
            $list[$i]['childs'] = makeListRecursive($list,$list[$i]['id']);
            $result[] = $list[$i];
        }
    }
    return $result;
}

$result = array();
$result = makeListRecursive($list);
echo '<pre>';
var_dump($result);
echo '</pre>';
share|improve this answer
    
This works very well too, thank you. I went with Joe's approach because it is less code. –  Wesley Murch Feb 10 '12 at 8:20
    
Actually, the other working answer failed when the array was in a different order, while this one worked. –  Wesley Murch Feb 22 '12 at 21:22

Tested and working :)

$list = array(...);
$nested = array();

foreach ($list as $item)
{
    if ($item['parent_id'] == 0)
    {
        // Woot, easy - top level
        $nested[$item['id']] = $item;
    }
    else
    {
        // Not top level, find it's place
        process($item, $nested);
    }
}

// Recursive function
function process($item, &$arr)
{
    if (is_array($arr))
    {
        foreach ($arr as $key => $parent_item)
        {
            // Match?
            if (isset($parent_item['id']) && $parent_item['id'] == $item['parent_id'])
            {
                $arr[$key]['children'][$item['id']] = $item;
            }
            else
            {
                // Keep looking, recursively
                process($item, $arr[$key]);
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
At the top of your first post is a block of code with $list = array(... - copy that into my code, overwriting the first line: $list = array(...); - Now, after the foreach(), do print_r($nested) and see what you've got :) It should plug in to makeList pretty easily. Hm, your comment is deleted. I'll leave this here anyway :) –  Joe Feb 10 '12 at 8:01
    
Good stuff. Have fun :) –  Joe Feb 10 '12 at 8:03
    
I wish it was more active here right now, you deserve way more rep from this. I'll come back to give you the check mark in the morning. –  Wesley Murch Feb 10 '12 at 8:04
    
Just got make 30 accounts, farm the rep you need on them, and come up-vote me :P Simples. –  Joe Feb 10 '12 at 8:05
1  
Hm, well sorry to annoy you - the array given was merely an example, the actual source array could be in a different order. It sounded like you understood what I was going for. Either way, I still appreciate the help and code. –  Wesley Murch Feb 22 '12 at 23:44

Some methods I recently wrote, maybe some will help, sorry I'm short on time and cannot rewite them to match your needs.

This code is actually a part of Kohana Framework Model, method ->as_array() is used to flat an Database_Result object.

function array_tree($all_nodes){
    $tree = array();
    foreach($all_nodes as $node){
        $tree[$node->id]['fields'] = $node->as_array();
        $tree[$node->id]['children'] = array();

        if($node->parent_id){
             $tree[$node->parent_id]['children'][$node->id] =& $tree[$node->id];
        }
    }


    $return_tree = array();
    foreach($tree as $node){
        if($node['fields']['depth'] == 0){
            $return_tree[$node['fields']['id']] = $node;
        }
    }

    return $return_tree;
}

array_tree() is used to make a tree out of a flat array. The key feature is the =& part ;)

function html_tree($tree_array = null){
        if( ! $tree_array){
           $tree_array = $this -> array_tree();
        }

        $html_tree = '<ul>'."\n";
        foreach($tree_array as $node){
            $html_tree .= $this->html_tree_crawl($node);
        }
        $html_tree .= '</ul>'."\n";


        return $html_tree;
    }

function html_tree_crawl($node){
        $children = null;

        if(count($node['children']) > 0){
            $children = '<ul>'."\n";
            foreach($node['children'] as $chnode){
                $children .= $this->html_tree_crawl($chnode);
            }
            $children .= '</ul>'."\n";
        }

        return $this->html_tree_node($node, $children);
    }

html_tree_node() is a simple method to display current node and children in HTML. Example below:

<li id="node-<?= $node['id'] ?>">
    <a href="#"><?= $node['title'] ?></a>
    <?= (isset($children) && $children != null) ? $children : '' ?>
</li>
share|improve this answer
    
I never ended up figuring out how to piece this together after digging through the Kohana source code. –  Wesley Murch Feb 22 '12 at 21:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.