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Currently we're developing a new Web Application. Customer says that it should support at least 1280x800 and above. On local environments it looks fine and it fits. But when I browse it on Galaxy Tab, the 1280x800 website doesn't look like a website running on 1280x800. On Galaxy Tab the website is truncated although the hardware setting of the Tab says that it is 1280x800. So the website is too big for 1280x800.
I know that you have to care about different screens and densities when you write an Android application, but we are talking about a website and not an Android application and I'm not sure what causes this behavior. Can anybody explain to me what's the reason for that?

[UPDATE]

Screenshot of Firefox (correct)
enter image description here

And now in Galaxy Tab (truncated) enter image description here

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It will be great if you can give a snapshot of both so that we can come up with any answer –  Django Anonymous Feb 10 '12 at 8:32
    
Ok, one moment. I will update the question... –  Bevor Feb 10 '12 at 8:41
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could try adding this to the <head> of your HTML document:

<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1">

The reason why this is needed is that high-DPI devices do not translate CSS px to screen pixels by default because most content is optimized for low-DPI screens and would be just too small to read. Another way to think about this is that, on these devices, websites are initially scaled by a factor of 1.5 or even 2. By giving the specified <meta> tag you can override this behavior and set the initial scale to 1.

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Thanks very much, this is the solution. –  Bevor Feb 10 '12 at 9:15
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It can be caused by different pixel pitches. I'd recommend you to read this.

Here is a pixel pitch calculator for different screen sizes.

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Pixel pitch doesn't matter for sizes in measured in pixels. Something 100x100px will take the same percentage of the screen space on two 1280x800px screen even if they have different pixel pitches. Pixel pitches does matter for sizes measured in inches or the like, since a device with a higher pixel has more pixels-per-inch. I guess that means that if any sizes aren't given in pixels, you should convert them to pixels. –  ikegami Feb 10 '12 at 9:18
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@ikegami nope. High-DPI devices do not translate CSS px to screen pixels by default because most content is optimized for low-DPI screens and would be just too small to read. Another way to think about this is that - on these devices - by default websites are scaled by a factor of 1.5 or even 2. This can be disabled through a meta tag, though. –  noah1989 Feb 10 '12 at 9:22
    
@noah1989, Thanks. You should say that in your answer. –  ikegami Feb 10 '12 at 9:57
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