Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using events to manage the ui after users log in and out of a website, when a login occurs a login event is published and when a user logs out a logout event is published.

With this system in place I am trying the idea of small inline bits of javascript to deal with the ui elements which subscribe to the events.

At the top of the page is a login/logout link so I am using the following code for changing the login status

<div id="account_panel" class="signed_out">
    <div class="in">
        <a href="/account" class="name"></a> | <a href="/account/signout">Sign-out</a>
    </div>
    <div class="out">
        <a href="/account/signin" class="signin">Sign-in</a> | <a href="/account/register" class="register">Register</a>
    </div>
</div>
<script>
    if (window.jQuery) {
        $('body').on('login.account.website', function(event, data){
            $('#account_panel').removeClass('signed_out').addClass('signed_in');
            if (data)
                jQuery('#account_panel .name').text(data.first_name+' '+data.last_name);
        });
    }
</script>

I have several pieces of code like this, the idea is they are all self contained and do not affect or directly depend on other things, the javascript only relates to the code next to it so it seems sensible to put them together.

The initial state of the html is generated server side to allow the site to function without javascript, a code snipit like this is also contained in its own template file.

I want to carry on using this method for various elements on the site but I am interested to find out if there is a better maintainable method I should be using.

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
have you seen the new codereview part of the StackExchange .... still beta but i think much better suited to this type of question –  ManseUK Feb 10 '12 at 9:24
    
I hadn't seen that site, I may repost there depending on the outcome of this question. Thanks –  ArthurGuy Feb 10 '12 at 9:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'd argue this method is difficult to maintain, having to track snippets of code scattered over multiple html documents. Why not keep the code in one place and bind to your events only when certain DOM elements are present:

if (window.jQuery) {
  function whenSignedOut(){
    $('body').on('login.account.website', function(event, data){
       $('#account_panel').removeClass('signed_out').addClass('signed_in');
       if (data)
           jQuery('#account_panel .name').text(data.first_name+' '+data.last_name);
    });
  }

  function whenSignedIn(){  
  }
}

if (window.jQuery) {
  $(document).ready(function(){
    if($('div#account_panel.signed_out').length > 0)) {
      whenSignedOut();
    }

    if($('div#account_panel.signed_in').length > 0)) {
      whenSignedIn();
    }
  });
}
share|improve this answer
    
Behind the scenes the code is separated into multiple files, for example the code in my question is contained in one file. The event names aren't going to change so the only time it will need to be altered is if the formatting of the buttons need to be adjusted and at this point everything you need is in one place. –  ArthurGuy Feb 10 '12 at 12:15

you can do that, but you must keep in mind, that as soon as the html-interpreter sees that javascript, it will immediately stop all rendering of the page, execute the javascript and then continue with the rendering. Thus, its ok for small javascript, that wont' block the rendering in such a way, that the user would notice it (but it is blocking!).

share|improve this answer
    
If that became an issue I presume I could wrap the snippets in jQuery's document ready –  ArthurGuy Feb 10 '12 at 9:29
    
also by using jquery.ready, rendering will stop. But by using the jquery.ready functionallity, you are laveraging the heavy-computation to the end. –  japrescott Feb 10 '12 at 10:52

I think that if you put all these little bits into one js file and comment this in a good way it wil be a lot more clear to see. Because you only have to look in one place for the JavaScript. If you are planning to work together with another person or have another person look at it in the future, definitely put everything into js file(s) that is where the other person will look.

If you're not planning to do this then the point is, what do you want, what do you find the most useful.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response, behind the scenes the chunks of code like this are in individual html template files, if I separate them I am potentially making them more difficult to maintain as the functionality is spread across 2 files. –  ArthurGuy Feb 10 '12 at 9:26
    
That was where I was going indeed, glad to help:) –  Rick Hoving Feb 10 '12 at 10:00

In my opinion its fine to use these inline subsections of code for specific tasks just related to the code its with - larger libraries / js files are for more generic code. I use these kinds of sub sections all of the time.

If you are using HTML4 doctype then the type attribute is required on the script tag- see W3C

<script type="text/javascript">
// code here
</script>
share|improve this answer
    
I wouldn't suggest doing that - the default value of the type attribute is "text/javascript", so specifying it is pointless. What other options are there anyway? –  Rich Bradshaw Feb 10 '12 at 9:26
    
The site is using the html5 doctype which removes the need to specify this. –  ArthurGuy Feb 10 '12 at 9:27
    
OK - added comment for clarity –  ManseUK Feb 10 '12 at 9:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.