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i want to count how many numbers from 0 to 9 is in string. tried some code but it don't works, it returns 0 every time. whats wrong and how to fix? also if u can tell me how do it with srting.Count() method. thanks.

// Attempt 1
string str = textBox1.Text;
int b = 0;
int n = 0;
foreach (char a in str)
{
    if ((b > 0) && (b < 9))
    {
        if ((char)b == a)
            n++;
    }
}
label1.Text = n;

// Attempt 2
string str = textBox1.Text;
int n = 0;
foreach (char a in str)
{
    int[] k = { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 };
    foreach (int b in k)
    {
        if (b == a)
            n += 1;
    }
}
label1.Text = n
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1  
The main concept that you are missing is that the number zero is a completely different thing from the symbol 0 that we use to represent that number. Your string would contain the code for the character symbol 0, not the number zero. (And so on with the number one and the symbol 1.) –  David Schwartz Feb 10 '12 at 9:32

9 Answers 9

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use a simple regex for that?

  var matches = System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex.Matches("1 2 3 4 5 6 10 11 12", "(?<![0-9])[0-9](?![0-9])");
  Console.WriteLine(matches.Count);

Outputs 6. This picks up only the isolated digits, not the ones that are part of two or more digit numbers.

EDIT: I somehow completely missed the question tag being 'c#' and wrote my original answer in python. Conveniently the actual regex pattern syntax required is the same in both python and c#.

share|improve this answer
    
i don't understand... –  samuraisxmali Feb 10 '12 at 9:52
    
What don't you understand? –  Benedict Feb 10 '12 at 10:42
    
Maybe, since the question is tagged as c# –  L.B Feb 10 '12 at 11:28
    
Geez I am so dumb. Hang about...I'll change my answer to the right language... –  Benedict Feb 10 '12 at 12:41
    
thanks, it works perfect. –  samuraisxmali Feb 10 '12 at 14:12

An example of using string.count:

int result = "1 2 2 5 2 4".Count(char.IsDigit);

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I was wondering when someone was going to suggest checking the unicode categories! –  MattDavey Feb 10 '12 at 9:31
3  
As this is a homework question I think the solution deserves a little more explanation. Here the Count() method is acting on the string as an IEnumerable<Char> sequence of individual characters. The 'Char.IsDigit' method is a predicate which effectively filters out any characters which are not digits, this you are left with a count of the characters which are digits. Worth noting that we are working with LINQ and the Char type here, not System.String directly. –  MattDavey Feb 10 '12 at 9:33
    
thanks very much for explaining that method, but i wanted this: to count only 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 and nothing more, such 21, 34, 56, 234 and so on... and in your case, it counts the other number too... –  samuraisxmali Feb 10 '12 at 9:46

With your current approach you would need to convert each character a from a character code into the corresponding integer. Use Int32.Parse(). In one of your attempts you used a (char)b cast but all this does is to give a character with the character code b.

It would be easier to write the test like this

foreach (char a in str)
    if ((a>='0') && (a<='9'))
        ....

Here I am using the syntax for a character literal, '0' as opposed to "0" which is a string literal.

share|improve this answer
    
i want to count only 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 and nothing more, such 21, 34, 56, 234 and so on... –  samuraisxmali Feb 10 '12 at 9:54
    
Your code samples did not indicate that. You'll need a more complex algorithm to solve that problem. –  David Heffernan Feb 10 '12 at 9:55
    
because of this i tried to use int[] k, but... can you help and give any code? thanks for answer at any rate. –  samuraisxmali Feb 10 '12 at 10:06
int n=0;
foreach (char a in str)
{
    if (a >= '0' && a <= '9')
          n++;
}

Just use this.
Explanation: Code of ASCII character 0 is 48 and character 9 is 57 (here you can find all character codes) and when you're comparing characters in C# it compares their's codes.
You could write if (a >= 48 && a <= 57)) and it would work as well. Hope it helped.
EDIT: I read your comment.

for(int = 1; i < str.length-1; i++)
{
    if(Char.IsDigit(str[i])) &&
       !Char.IsDigit(str[i-1]) &&
       !Char.IsDigit(str[i+1]))
        n++;
}

After this you should check first and last characters. That's all.

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2  
Not usually considered good form giving code solutions to homework questions, especially without explanation. We have enough witless clowns in the industry already :-) –  paxdiablo Feb 10 '12 at 9:27
    
one more thing, it counts chars from 0 to 9, so when i write number 32 or something else more than 9 it counts it too... –  samuraisxmali Feb 10 '12 at 9:36
    
Do you want to count digital characters in your string or count numbers like 234 or 78235? If you want to count numbers you should use regular expressions. –  shift66 Feb 10 '12 at 9:37
    
i want to count only 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 and nothing more, such 21, 34, 56, 234 and so on... –  samuraisxmali Feb 10 '12 at 9:42
    
o, wait, Ill edit my answer. –  shift66 Feb 10 '12 at 9:43

This should help you

public int CountDigits(string text)
{
    return text.Cast<int>().Count(c => c >= 48 && c <= 57);
}
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In your first example, the condition if ((b > 0) && (b < 9)) is always false, because b starts out at zero and is never modified.

share|improve this answer
    
it don't works. i changed: int b = 1; and also if ((b >= 0) && (b < 9));(when b = 0) but nothing changes... –  samuraisxmali Feb 10 '12 at 9:28
    
b is the wrong thing to be checking anyway - I think several of the other answers now explain this and provide a working solution. –  DNA Feb 10 '12 at 9:29

Bit hard to tell how your code is sequenced but, in the first block you set b to 0 and never change it.

That means that ((b > 0) && (b < 9)) will always be false.

I think you should probably be checking a rather than b.

You'll also strike the problem that the character '0' is not the same as the integer 0.

share|improve this answer
string str = "429gfsj58347583jhfs094248324";

  for(j=0;j<=9;j++)
  {
     if (str.Contains(j.ToString()))
     {
       n++;
     }
   }

Response.Write(n.ToString());


Will return the numbers frequency
Answer: 20

If you want the count separatly please ask freely.

Regards,

Madan Tiwari
share|improve this answer
    
This code can't return the answer 20 because it only goes round the loop 10 times. It is counting how many different digits are in the string, not how many total digits are in the string. –  DNA Feb 10 '12 at 14:24

I ran into this problem and LINQ wasn't available. However it was easy enough to port it the basic idea in the LINQ solution. Here's the nonLINQ solution:

int formatLength = 0;
foreach(char maybeDigit in format) {
           //use a ternary expression since C# can't cast bool to int
           formatLength += Char.IsDigit(maybeDigit) ? 1 : 0;
}
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