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I use .NET 3.5 for this.

I have an enum:

[System.SerializableAttribute()]
public enum MyEnum
{
    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlEnumAttribute("035")]
    Item1,
    Item2
}

I use this enum in a class:

[System.SerializableAttribute()]
public class Employee
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public MyEnum MyEnum { get; set; }
}

Now I want to create a new Eplomyee-instance, set the MyEnum-property by casting it from a string. Then serialize it and save it in a file.

Employee bob = new Employee() {Id = 1, Name = "Bob"};
bob.MyEnum = (MijnEnum)Enum.Parse(typeof(MyEnum), string.Format(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, "{0}", "035"));

XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(Employee));
FileInfo fi = new FileInfo(@"C:\myfile.xml");
using (FileStream stream = fi.OpenWrite())
{
    XmlWriterSettings xmlWriterSettings = new XmlWriterSettings { Encoding = Encoding.UTF8, OmitXmlDeclaration = true, Indent = true };
    using (XmlWriter writer = XmlWriter.Create(stream, xmlWriterSettings))
    {
        serializer.Serialize(writer, bob); // this is place where it goes wrong
    }
}

If I debug this, I see that the value of bob.MyEnum is 35

When I try to serialize, I get an exception:

There was an error generating the XML document.

Instance validation error: '35' is not a valid value for WindowsFormsApplication.MyEnum.

What is going wrong and how can I solve this?

share|improve this question
3  
You are doing it very wrong. Specifically Enum.Parse. –  leppie Feb 10 '12 at 10:38
    
Have you tried to assign: Item1 = 25, in the enum declaration? –  Erno de Weerd Feb 10 '12 at 10:38
1  
You know you can just use [Serializable] instead of [System.SerializableAttribute()]? –  Botz3000 Feb 10 '12 at 10:39
    
@leppie: enlighten me. Perhaps this can solve my problem. –  Natrium Feb 10 '12 at 10:45
    
@Botz3000: yes, I know that. The attribute was auto-generated, hence the full name... –  Natrium Feb 10 '12 at 10:46

3 Answers 3

Let's start:

[System.SerializableAttribute()] // useless, valuetype is implicitly so
public enum MyEnum
{
    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlEnumAttribute("035")]
    Item1,
    Item2
}

Now the XmlEnumAttribute controls how that value is serialized and deserialized in XML.

IT HAS NOTHING TO WITH THE REST OF YOUR CODE! (sorry for the caps, but no-one else seems to get this).

So when a value of MyEnum.Item1 get serialized, "035" will be emitted.

Now the problem is how you want to assign this.

It is simple. Just assign like you would normally do. None these attributes change semantics of normal code, everything stays the same.

Example:

Employee bob = new Employee() {Id = 1, Name = "Bob", MyEnum = MyEnum.Item1};

There is abolutely no reason why Enum.Parse should even be considered here. The enum type and value is statically known.

If you did want to use Enum.Parse, use it like normal, example:

Enum.Parse(typeof(MyEnum), "Item1")
share|improve this answer
    
I have to parse the string to enum. Ok, I hardcoded "035" here in my example. But in my program, it comes from a variable. –  Natrium Feb 10 '12 at 11:09
    
@Natrium: If it is a variable, just assign it! You are doing things in a very complex and unneeded way. –  leppie Feb 10 '12 at 11:13
    
you can tweet all you want, but this seriously does not work... –  Natrium Feb 10 '12 at 11:15
    
@Natrium: What does not work? Show me, I can't really tell what you are attempting to do any more. –  leppie Feb 10 '12 at 11:18
    
@Natrium: I am still waiting (and trying and willing) to help you. Please explain where what goes wrong. –  leppie Feb 10 '12 at 11:27

This is happening because, Enums are internally store as int. Hence your statement bob.MyEnum = (MijnEnum)Enum.Parse(typeof(MyEnum), string.Format(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, "{0}", "035")); is running without issue. If you debug, value of bob.MyEnum is 35. When you deserialize this, deserializer searches for matching enum with int value 35, which is not there, as you are specifying Item1 and Item2. Hence you get an error.

This will work

 bob.MyEnum = (MyEnum)Enum.Parse(typeof(MyEnum), "35");

 public enum MyEnum {
   Item1 = 35,
   Item2
 }

Ideally you should be doing this

 bob.MyEnum = (MyEnum)Enum.Parse(typeof(MyEnum), "Single");

 public enum MyEnum {
   [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlEnumAttribute("Single")]
   Item1,
   Item2
 }

Hope this helps you.

share|improve this answer
    
As in, i didn't get you. I didn't give any solution. I explained why it happend. –  Amar Palsapure Feb 10 '12 at 10:55
1  
@leppie the user's input is a string. And i think you're comments here are a bit rude or offensive. IMO your reputation doesn't give you this privilege. –  onof Feb 10 '12 at 11:04
    
@onof: Sorry, if I am trying to point out the incorrectiveness of these answers, due to simple reasons like not reading a question and understanding the problem. I have now posted an answer. I didn't think it was needed, but it seems I was mistaken. –  leppie Feb 10 '12 at 11:08
    
While I was a bit surprised that snippet 1 works (you get your downvote back ;p), the second snippet still does not work or do anything the OP has not tried. –  leppie Feb 10 '12 at 17:12

I changed the enum-parsing.

I used reflection to parse the string to the enum, as described in this article: http://www.codeguru.com/csharp/csharp/cs_syntax/enumerations/article.php/c5869

And now it works.

share|improve this answer
    
While I agree the above should work, it seems needlessly complex for a simple task. –  leppie Feb 10 '12 at 11:14
    
Do you know how this is different than Enum.Parse? –  gap Sep 4 '12 at 20:18

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