Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two divs within a container. One floats left and one floats right. Both are about 60% as wide as the container and are designed such that they overlap in the middle (right div takes priority).

How do I get them to overlap rather than stack vertically like floating elements usually do? If I absoultely position the right element the containing div doesn't expand to fit the content.

Code (unfortunately I cannot jsfiddle this as their servers are read only atm):

<div id="container">
    <div id="left">left</div>
    <div id="right">right</div>
</div>

#container {
    width: 400px;
    background-color: #eee;
}

#left {
    width: 250px;
    border: 1px solid #ccc;
    display: inline;
    float: left;
}

#right {
    width: 250px;
    border: 1px solid #ccc;
    display: inline;
    float: right;
}
share|improve this question
    
If I am correct "display:inline" attribute doesn't allow setting dimensions also. This means if you set your display to inline you are not supposed to define any widths and/or heights. And you float, that inline seems useless for me. I would use z-index which you can control through javascript on :hovers or click()s (swaps values between the two elements). How dynamic is your interface? –  benqus Feb 10 '12 at 11:45
    
The display:inline is redundant as any element that is floated is automatically display:block. –  Gareth Feb 10 '12 at 13:52

7 Answers 7

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Use a negative margin-right on the left box so that the right box is allowed to overlap:

#left {
    width: 250px;
    border: 1px solid #ccc;
    display: inline;
    float: left;
    margin-right:-104px;
}

The 104 pixels is the overlap amount plus 4px for borders.

Here's a jsfiddle.

share|improve this answer
    
So awesome. I've been looking for a solution to overlapping floated columns for a while (for auto-height tabs j.mp/1iQ30Fz) This is a perfect solution! –  sstur Apr 15 '14 at 1:34

You could create the divs with absolute position and add a positive z-index to the one you want to be in front.

<div id="container">
    <div id="left">left</div>
    <div id="right">right</div>
</div>

#container {
    width: 400px;
    background-color: #eee;
    position: relative;
}

#left {
    width: 250px;
    border: 1px solid #ccc;
    display: block;
    position: absolute;
    top: 0px;
    left: 0px;
}

#right {
    width: 250px;
    border: 1px solid #ccc;
    display: inline;
    position: absolute;
    top: 0px;
    right: 0px;
    z-index: 1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
In case you didn't know the "px" isn't needed when you define "0px" you can just use top: 0; save you some characters –  thenetimp Feb 10 '12 at 11:28
    
I have done this already but it means the parent container won't expand to fit the content –  Chris Feb 10 '12 at 11:44
    
You could put the widths of the container and of the divs with percentages instead of fixed values. e.g. container width: 100%, #left width 60% and #right width 60%. –  Stelian Matei Feb 10 '12 at 11:48

You can only do that with positioning.

<div id="container">
    <div id="left">left</div>
    <div id="right">right</div>
</div>

#container {
    width: 400px;
    background-color: #eee;
    position: relative;
}

#left {
    width: 250px;
    border: 1px solid #ccc;
    position: absolute;
    left: 0;
    top: 0;
    z-index: 1;
}

#right {
    width: 250px;
    border: 1px solid #ccc;
    position: absolute;
    right: 0;
    top: 0;
    z-index: 2;
}
share|improve this answer

Try this one:

<div id="container"> 
    <div id="left">left</div> 
    <div id="right">right</div> 
</div> 
<style>
#container { 
    width: 400px; 
    background-color: #eee; 
} 

#left { 
    width: 250px; 
    border: 1px solid #ccc; 
    float: left; 
} 

#right { 
    width: 250px; 
    border: 1px solid #ccc; 
    margin-left: 150px;
    position: absolute;
}
</style>
share|improve this answer

How about pulling the right div with negative margin. Something like this?

<div id="container">
    <div id="left">left</div>
    <div id="right">right</div>
</div>

#container {
    position: relative;
    width: 400px;
    height: 110px;
    background-color: #eee;
}

#left {
    width: 250px;
    height: 100px;
    border: 1px solid green;
    float: left;
}

#right {
    position: relative;
    float: right;
    width: 250px;
    height: 100px;
    top: -100px;
    border: 1px solid red;
}
share|improve this answer

Make container bigger so both fit. Then use position relative and left: -100px or whatever on the one on the right.

share|improve this answer

Can you add an extra div in there?

<div id="container"> 
    <div id="left">
        <div id="left-inner">left</div>
    </div> 
    <div id="right">right</div> 
</div> 
<style>
#container { 
    width: 400px; 
} 

#left { 
    float: left;
    width: 0px;
    overflow:visible; 
} 

#left-inner { 
    float: right;
    width: 250px; 
} 

#right { 
    width: 250px; 
}
</style>
share|improve this answer
    
Adding additional structure to accomplish styling is improper use of HTML and CSS. –  Bradley A. Tetreault Oct 5 '12 at 15:41
    
@Bradley A. Tetreault: as a general rule this is right. but reality is worst then this - take IE6-8 as an example and all it's fixes/hacks, which also involves a lot of div.fixer (or div#fixer) –  llamerr Mar 1 '13 at 11:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.