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In a C# app, suppose I have a single global class that contains some configuration items, like so :

public class Options  
{  
    int myConfigInt;  
    string myConfigString;  
    ..etc.  
}  

static Options GlobalOptions;

the members of this class will be uses across different threads :

Thread1: GlobalOptions.myConfigString = blah;

while

Thread2: string thingie = GlobalOptions.myConfigString;

Using a lock for access to the GlobalOptions object would also unnecessary block when 2 threads are accessing different members, but on the other hand creating a sync-object for every member seems a bit over the top too.

Also, using a lock on the global options would make my code less nice I think; if I have to write

string stringiwanttouse;
lock(GlobalOptions)
{
   stringiwanttouse = GlobalOptions.myConfigString;
}

everywhere (and is this thread-safe or is stringiwanttouse now just a pointer to myConfigString ? Yeah, I'm new to C#....) instead of

string stringiwanttouse = GlobalOptions.myConfigString;

it makes the code look horrible.

So... What is the best (and simplest!) way to ensure thread-safety ?

share|improve this question
    
I think it would be clearer yet if you could specify what problem you are trying to solve. There is no inherent danger in two threads setting a global value at around the same time. The CLR will not crash. What kind of synchronization problem are you trying to solve? – PeterAllenWebb May 28 '09 at 20:07
    
Well, what happens when one thread is writing to a string while another is trying to read it ? Will I always get either one or another string, or could it happen that I get I get a partially overwritten string ? – Led May 29 '09 at 12:16

You could wrap the field in question (myConfigString in this case) in a Property, and have code in the Get/Set that uses either a Monitor.Lock or a Mutex. Then, accessing the property only locks that single field, and doesn't lock the whole class.

Edit: adding code

private static object obj = new object(); // only used for locking
public static string MyConfigString {
    get {
       lock(obj)
       {
          return myConfigstring;
       }
    }
    set {
       lock(obj)
       {
          myConfigstring = value;
       }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Also, you don't need to lock on ints or any object which guarantees atomic operations (i.e., thread safety). – Ed S. May 28 '09 at 19:40
    
nice catch! thx Ed. – Mike May 28 '09 at 19:46
    
Ed that is a dangerous statement. thith.blogspot.com/2005/11/c-interlocked.html – dss539 May 28 '09 at 19:46
    
Sorry, I'm new to C#, so suppose I'd wrap it in a property with a get- and set accessor, how do I make the get thread-safe ? – Led May 28 '09 at 19:47

The following was written before the OP's edit:

public static class Options
{
    private static int _myConfigInt;
    private static string _myConfigString;

    private static bool _initialized = false;
    private static object _locker = new object();

    private static void InitializeIfNeeded()
    {
        if (!_initialized) {
            lock (_locker) {
                if (!_initialized) {
                    ReadConfiguration();
                    _initalized = true;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    private static void ReadConfiguration() { // ... }

    public static int MyConfigInt {
        get {
            InitializeIfNeeded();
            return _myConfigInt;
        }
    }

    public static string MyConfigString {
        get {
            InitializeIfNeeded();
            return _myConfigstring;
        }
    }
    //..etc. 
}


After that edit, I can say that you should do something like the above, and only set configuration in one place - the configuration class. That way, it will be the only class modifying the configuration at runtime, and only when a configuration option is to be retrieved.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think he is trying to synchronize access to his config file, which is what it looks like you've given. Also, you have provided readonly access. – dss539 May 28 '09 at 19:49
    
I deliberately made the access read-only. It's a configuration class. The only thing modifying the configuration should be the class. – John Saunders May 28 '09 at 19:50
    
My mistake, sorry John, after rereading my question I found it to be too vague indeed so I tried to elaborate a bit.. – Led May 28 '09 at 19:53
    
Also, since you're new to C#, you should look up the use of the various classes in the System.Configuration namespace. In particular, if you're using Windows Forms (which you didn't say), then a Settings file is just right for you, as it allows per-user settings to be saved per-user, while keeping application-wide settings in one place. It's also dead easy to use. Right-click your project, choose "Properties", and click the "Settings" tab, and follow the instructions. – John Saunders May 28 '09 at 20:42
    
Thanks again John, good advice ! I'll look into it ! – Led May 29 '09 at 12:17

Your configurations may be 'global', but they should not be exposed as a global variable. If configurations don't change, they should be used to construct the objects that need the information - either manually or through a factory object. If they can change, then an object that watches the configuration file/database/whatever and implements the Observer pattern should be used.

Global variables (even those that happen to be a class instance) are a Bad Thing™

share|improve this answer
    
in this case it's mostly about a string specifying a download-directory that can be changed by the user at any time. I think the Observer-pattern might be overkill for just 1 or 2 global strings ? – Led May 28 '09 at 19:45
    
To elaborate, this is not production-code. I know about the ethics of programming ;) This is just a small hobby-project tool for my own use. – Led May 28 '09 at 19:51

What do you mean by thread safety here? It's not the global object that needs to be thread safe, it is the accessing code. If two threads write to a member variable near the same instant, one of them will "win", but is that a problem? If your client code depends on the global value staying constant until it is done with some unit of processing, then you will need to create a synchronization object for each property that needs to be locked. There isn't any great way around that. You could just cache a local copy of the value to avoid problems, but the applicability of that fix will depend on your circumstances. Also, I wouldn't create a synch object for each property by default, but instead as you realize you will need it.

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