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I have an application at http://prettydiff.com/prettydiff.js. I started writing this application before interpreters got really fast and learned to prefer strict typing. I now want to enforce strict typing in my code. This application is too large and complex to easily verify that type coercion is successfully eliminated from manual changes.

Is there any tool or method to warn or detect when a change of type has occurred to any given reference?

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Not that I know of. You can't really enforce strong typing in a language that doesn't enforce it itself. Instead, you could write everything using GWT, for instance, where you have Java's strong typing, and compile that to JS. However, I think you'd fare better writing a good test suite for your app, and run that to check your changes. Trying to do strong typing in JS is going against the grain. –  Flambino Feb 10 '12 at 13:57
    
@Flambino I agree that strong typing in JavaScript is a bit of a challenge if you are so disciplined from the very beginning, but it is still a valued preference of the latest interpreters none the less. –  austincheney Feb 10 '12 at 14:01
    
You want to know, after you've made a code change, if the types of any variables or parameters have changed? –  Ira Baxter Feb 10 '12 at 18:01

1 Answer 1

what about something like this ?

function setValue(varName, varValue) {
    if (typeof(eval("varName")) != typeof(varValue)) {
        console.log("Variable "+varName+" changed type.");
    }
    eval(varName+"=varValue;");
}

this is custom, but may do a strict type validation

var n = 100;
setValue("n", 20); // updates to 20
setValue("n", "Hello"); // updates to "Hello", and prints the warning in console
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