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Running the following (slightly pseudo)code produces the following results. Im shocked at how innacurate the timer is (gains ~14ms each Tick).

Is there anything more accurate out there?

void Main()
{
   var timer = new System.Threading.Timer(TimerCallback, null, 0, 1000);
}

void TimerCallback(object state)
{
   Debug.WriteLine(DateTime.Now.ToString("ss.ffff"));
}

Sample Output:
...
11.9109
12.9190
13.9331
14.9491
15.9632
16.9752
17.9893
19.0043
20.0164
21.0305
22.0445
23.0586
24.0726
25.0867
26.1008
27.1148
28.1289
29.1429
30.1570
31.1710
32.1851
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2  
Did you even bother to try a search? This question has been asked literally dozens of times before. Massive sigh – Noldorin Feb 10 '12 at 13:18
1  
@Noldorin Four years later and it's now #1 in Google for ".net precise timer" – Matt Thomas Jan 7 at 16:34
up vote 15 down vote accepted

For exact time measuring you need to use the Stopwatch class MSDN

share|improve this answer
    
High accuracy and low overhead. You can use Stopwatch.StartNew() to create a new timer and timer.Stop() to stop it. If you do nothing then only 1 or 2 ticks will elapse. – yoyo Nov 5 '13 at 21:21

Timer and DateTime do not have enough accuracy for your purpose. Try the Stopwatch instead. Look at the following article for more details:

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2010/04/08/precision-and-accuracy-of-datetime.aspx

share|improve this answer

I also have witten a class which is accurate to 1ms. I took Hans Passant's code from forum
https://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/6cd5d9e3-e01a-49c4-9976-6c6a2f16ad57/1-millisecond-timer
and wrapped it in a class for ease of use in your Form. You can easily set up multiple timers if you want. In the example code below I have used 2 timers. I have tested it and it works ok.

// AccurateTimer.cs
using System;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

namespace YourProjectsNamespace
{
    class AccurateTimer
    {
        private delegate void TimerEventDel(int id, int msg, IntPtr user, int dw1, int dw2);
        private const int TIME_PERIODIC = 1;
        private const int EVENT_TYPE = TIME_PERIODIC;// + 0x100;  // TIME_KILL_SYNCHRONOUS causes a hang ?!
        [DllImport("winmm.dll")]
        private static extern int timeBeginPeriod(int msec);
        [DllImport("winmm.dll")]
        private static extern int timeEndPeriod(int msec);
        [DllImport("winmm.dll")]
        private static extern int timeSetEvent(int delay, int resolution, TimerEventDel handler, IntPtr user, int eventType);
        [DllImport("winmm.dll")]
        private static extern int timeKillEvent(int id);

        Action mAction;
        Form mForm;
        private int mTimerId;
        private TimerEventDel mHandler;  // NOTE: declare at class scope so garbage collector doesn't release it!!!

        public AccurateTimer(Form form,Action action,int delay)
        {
            mAction = action;
            mForm = form;
            timeBeginPeriod(1);
            mHandler = new TimerEventDel(TimerCallback);
            mTimerId = timeSetEvent(delay, 0, mHandler, IntPtr.Zero, EVENT_TYPE);
        }

        public void Stop()
        {
            int err = timeKillEvent(mTimerId);
            timeEndPeriod(1);
            System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(100);// Ensure callbacks are drained
        }

        private void TimerCallback(int id, int msg, IntPtr user, int dw1, int dw2)
        {
            if (mTimerId != 0)
                mForm.BeginInvoke(mAction);
        }
    }
}

// FormMain.cs
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace YourProjectsNamespace
{
    public partial class FormMain : Form
    {
        AccurateTimer mTimer1,mTimer2;

        public FormMain()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void FormMain_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            int delay = 10;   // In milliseconds. 10 = 1/100th second.
            mTimer1 = new AccurateTimer(this, new Action(TimerTick1),delay);
            delay = 100;      // 100 = 1/10th second.
            mTimer2 = new AccurateTimer(this, new Action(TimerTick2), delay);
        }

        private void FormMain_FormClosing(object sender, FormClosingEventArgs e)
        {
            mTimer1.Stop();
            mTimer2.Stop();
        }

        private void TimerTick1()
        {
            // Put your first timer code here!
        }

        private void TimerTick2()
        {
            // Put your second timer code here!
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Its not the timer that is inaccurate, but DateTime.Now, which has an advertised tolerance of 16ms.

Instead I would use the Environment.Ticks property to measure the CPU cycles during this test.

Edit: Environment.Ticks is also based off the system timer and may have the same accuracy issues as DateTime.Now. I'd advise choosing the StopWatch instead as many other answerers have mentioned.

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1  
Environment.Ticks is Environment.TickCount now – husayt Nov 11 '15 at 1:39

Desktop operating system (such as windows) are not real-time operating system. which means, you can't expect full accuracy and you can't force the scheduler to trigger your code in the exact millisecond you want. Specially in .NET application which is non-deterministic...for examply, any time the GC can start collecting, a JIT compilation might be a bit slower or a bit faster....

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I think the other answers are failing to address why there's 14ms slew through each iteration of the OP's code; it's not because of an imprecise system clock (and DateTime.Now is not inaccurate, unless you've turned off NTP services or have the wrong time zone set or something silly! It's only imprecise).

Accurate timer

Even with an imprecise system clock (making use of DateTime.Now, or having a solar cell hooked up to an ADC to tell how high the sun is in the sky, or dividing the time between peak tides, or ...), code following this pattern will have an average of zero slew (it will be perfectly accurate with exactly one second between ticks on average):

var interval = new TimeSpan(0, 0, 1);
var nextTick = DateTime.Now + interval;
while (true)
{
    while (DateTime.Now > nextTick)
    {
        Thread.Sleep(nextTick - DateTime.Now);
    }
    nextTick += interval; // Notice we're adding onto when the last tick was supposed to be, not when it is now
    // Insert tick() code here
}

(If you're copying-and-pasting this, watch out for cases where your tick code takes longer than interval to execute. I'll leave it as an exercise for the reader to find the easy ways to make this skip as many beats as it takes for nextTick to land in the future)

Inaccurate timer

I'm guessing that Microsoft's implementation of System.Threading.Timer follows this kind of pattern instead. This pattern will always have slew even with a perfectly precise and perfectly accurate system timer (because it takes time to execute even just the add operation):

var interval = new TimeSpan(0, 0, 1);
var nextTick = DateTime.Now + interval;
while (true)
{
    while (DateTime.Now > nextTick)
    {
        Thread.Sleep(nextTick - DateTime.Now);
    }
    nextTick = DateTime.Now + interval; // Notice we're adding onto .Now instead of when the last tick was supposed to be. This is where slew comes from
    // Insert tick() code here
}

So for folks who might be interested in rolling your own timer, don't follow this second pattern.

Precise time measurement

As other posters have said, the Stopwatch class gives great precision for time measurement, but doesn't help at all with accuracy if the wrong pattern is followed. But, as @Shahar said it's not like you're ever going to get a perfectly-precise timer to begin with, so you need to rethink things if perfect precision is what you're after.

Disclaimers

Note that Microsoft doesn't talk much about the internals of the System.Threading.Timer class so I'm educatedly speculating about it, but if it quacks like a duck then it's probably a duck. Also, I realize this is several years old, but it's still a relevant (and I think unanswered) question.

Edit: Changed link to @Shahar's answer

share|improve this answer
1  
There is a good MSDN article but you need to use the wayback machine to view it. "Comparing the Timer Classes in the .NET Framework Class Library" one of the qualities of the timers is "Metronome-quality beat" which is what your "Accurate timer" paragraph is talking about, if anyone wants more information. – Scott Chamberlain Jan 7 at 17:43

I've made a class for that, and it seems to be working just fine. No inaccuracy whatsoever:

class AccurateTimer
{

    public event EventHandler<EventArgs> Tick;

    public bool Running { get; private set; }
    public int Interval { get; private set; }

    public AccurateTimer(int interval_ = 1000)
    {
        Running = false;
        Interval = interval_;
    }

    public void Start()
    {
        Running = true;
        Thread thread = new Thread(Run);
        thread.Start();
    }

    public void Stop()
    {
        Running = false;
    }

    private void Run()
    {
        DateTime nextTick = DateTime.Now.AddMilliseconds(Interval);
        while (Running)
        {
            if (DateTime.Now > nextTick)
            {
                nextTick = nextTick.AddMilliseconds(Interval);
                OnTick(EventArgs.Empty);
            }
        }
    }

    protected void OnTick(EventArgs e)
    {
        EventHandler<EventArgs> copy = Tick;
        if (copy != null)
        {
            copy(this, e);
        }
    }

}

It might not be the best solution, though.

share|improve this answer
2  
That's a really bad implementation. You are creating a thread and performing infinite loop in it counting inaccurate DateTime ticks. That leads to continues CPU stack/cache swapping on single-threaded machines. On multi-threaded/core machines you're occupying 1 thread continuously that sucks in terms off resource consumption. – SOReader Nov 12 '14 at 8:42
    
You could use Thread.SpinWait to reduce CPU load. – Sinatr Jul 27 '15 at 12:10

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