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Running the following (slightly pseudo)code produces the following results. Im shocked at how innacurate the timer is (gains ~14ms each Tick).

Is there anything more accurate out there?

void Main()
{
   var timer = new System.Threading.Timer(TimerCallback, null, 0, 1000);
}

void TimerCallback(object state)
{
   Debug.WriteLine(DateTime.Now.ToString("ss.ffff"));
}

Sample Output:
...
11.9109
12.9190
13.9331
14.9491
15.9632
16.9752
17.9893
19.0043
20.0164
21.0305
22.0445
23.0586
24.0726
25.0867
26.1008
27.1148
28.1289
29.1429
30.1570
31.1710
32.1851
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2  
Did you even bother to try a search? This question has been asked literally dozens of times before. Massive sigh –  Noldorin Feb 10 '12 at 13:18

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

For exact time measuring you need to use the Stopwatch class MSDN

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High accuracy and low overhead. You can use Stopwatch.StartNew() to create a new timer and timer.Stop() to stop it. If you do nothing then only 1 or 2 ticks will elapse. –  yoyo Nov 5 '13 at 21:21

Timer and DateTime do not have enough accuracy for your purpose. Try the Stopwatch instead. Look at the following article for more details:

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2010/04/08/precision-and-accuracy-of-datetime.aspx

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Its not the timer that is inaccurate, but DateTime.Now, which has an advertised tolerance of 16ms.

Instead I would use the Environment.Ticks property to measure the CPU cycles during this test.

Edit: Environment.Ticks is also based off the system timer and may have the same accuracy issues as DateTime.Now. I'd advise choosing the StopWatch instead as many other answerers have mentioned.

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Desktop operating system (such as windows) are not real-time operating system. which means, you can't expect full accuracy and you can't force the scheduler to trigger your code in the exact millisecond you want. Specially in .NET application which is non-deterministic...for examply, any time the GC can start collecting, a JIT compilation might be a bit slower or a bit faster....

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I've made a class for that, and it seems to be working just fine. No inaccuracy whatsoever:

class AccurateTimer
{

    public event EventHandler<EventArgs> Tick;

    public bool Running { get; private set; }
    public int Interval { get; private set; }

    public AccurateTimer(int interval_ = 1000)
    {
        Running = false;
        Interval = interval_;
    }

    public void Start()
    {
        Running = true;
        Thread thread = new Thread(Run);
        thread.Start();
    }

    public void Stop()
    {
        Running = false;
    }

    private void Run()
    {
        DateTime nextTick = DateTime.Now.AddMilliseconds(Interval);
        while (Running)
        {
            if (DateTime.Now > nextTick)
            {
                nextTick = nextTick.AddMilliseconds(Interval);
                OnTick(EventArgs.Empty);
            }
        }
    }

    protected void OnTick(EventArgs e)
    {
        EventHandler<EventArgs> copy = Tick;
        if (copy != null)
        {
            copy(this, e);
        }
    }

}

It might not be the best solution, though.

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