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I am trying to create an object pool which will have objects of diffrent types.

Will it be possible , If i passed a string as ps a parameter to RetriveFunction(); it should rturn a new object of string type or feth it from pool?

string will contain name of type.

Eg;

    Object RetriveFromPool(string typename)
    {
          if()//object does not present
           {
               //return new object of typename
           }
          else
           {
               //feth it from pool
           }
     }

will it be possible?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, this is possible. A Dictionary is a convenient way to store key value pairs with O(1) lookup and Activator is capable of instantiating a type known only at runtime:

private IDictionary<string, object> _objectPool;
object RetriveFromPool(string typeName)
{     
    if(_objectPool.ContainsKey(typeName))
    {
        return _objectPool[typename]; // return from the pool
    }
    return Activator.CreateInstance(Type.GetType(typeName)); // Try to create a new object using the default constructor
 }

As an alternate however (to ensure compile time type checking) you may wish to use generics to achieve this:

private IDictionary<Type, object> _objectPool;
public T RetrieveFromPool<T>() where T : new() 
{
  Type type = typeof(T);
  return _objectPool.ContainsKey(type) ? (T)_objectPool[type] : new T();
}

// Update - add a couple of templates for add methods:

public void AddToPool<T>() where T : new
{
  _objectPool[typeof(T)] = new T();
}

public void AddToPool<T>(T poolObject) where T : new
{
  _objectPool[typeof(T)] = poolObject;
}
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Is it possible to avoid reflection? –  NIlesh Lanke Feb 10 '12 at 13:31
    
@NIleshLanke See update. –  rich.okelly Feb 10 '12 at 13:34
    
@rich.okelly Darn you, you keep stealing my ideas! We are thinking exactly on the same page. You have a mistake in your first sample, though. You never store the newly instantiated object. Same goes for the second one, actually. –  Zenexer Feb 10 '12 at 13:35
    
@Zenexer That was intentional (the 'error', not the sharing of ideas!). The OP didn't say that he wanted the method to add to the pool on a cache miss. –  rich.okelly Feb 10 '12 at 13:37
    
Ah. Well, he has an alternative answer in case he does. Good thinking, though. ;) –  Zenexer Feb 10 '12 at 13:38
show 2 more comments

If your types are known at compiletime, you would be better off with generics:

IDictionary<Type, object> Pool = new Dictionary<Type, object>();

T RetrieveFromPool<T>()
    where T : new()
{
    if (Pool.ContainsKey(typeof(T)))
    {
        return Pool[typeof(T)];
    }

    return Pool[typeof(T)] = new T();
}

Here's the safest way using strings/reflection that I can devise:

IDictionary<string, object> Pool = new Dictionary<string, object>();

object RetrieveFromPool(string typeName)
{
    if (Pool.ContainsKey(typeName))
    {
        return Pool[typeName];
    }

    Type type = Type.GetType(typeName);
    if (type == null)
    {
        return null;
    }

    ConstructorInfo ctor = type.GetConstructor(Type.EmptyTypes);
    if (ctor == null)
    {
        return null;
    }

    object obj = ctor.Invoke(new object[0]);
    Pool[typeName] = obj;
    return obj;
}
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