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I have the following C# methods:

public Vector2 GetVectorToTile(int x, int y)
    {
        return new Vector2(x * TileWidth, y * TileHeight);
    }
public Vector2 GetVectorToTile(Point start)
    {
        return GetVectorToTile(start.X, start.Y);
    }

The second method overloads the first in a very simple manner. However, I don't really like such an "input sanitizer overload"- I feel that there shouldn't be a separate method for converting each possible input type.

Now if the input of the first method was a single Vector2 instead of two numbers, I could use conditional arguments such that if the argument is Point instead of Vector2, it should first convert from Point to Vector2 and then proceed as usual.

However, that is not the case.

So my question is, how can I tell the method to accept "EITHER two integers OR a single point", and then convert the latter into the former before computing a result?

I can do this in a contrived manner in Matlab, but it looks completely unrelated to C#:

function result = VectorToTile(varargin)
    x = 0;
    y = 0;

    if size(varargin{1}) == [1, 1]
        disp('Assuming Vector input!');
        x = varargin{1}{1}.x; % Assuming the "Vector2" equivalent is a struct with .x and .y
        y = varargin{1}{1}.y;
    else
        disp('Assuming integer pair input!');
        x = varargin{1}{1};
        y = varargin{1}{2};
    end

    result.x = x * 32; % An example value for TileWidth
    result.y = y * 32; % An example value for TileHeight
end

This will work with the following two inputs:

ints{1} = 25;
ints{2} = 125;
VectorToTile(ints);

vect{1}.x = 25;
vect{1}.y = 125;
VectorToTile(vect);

It illustrates what I want to do, but unfortunately there isn't really a varargin in C#, nor is everything treated as a matrix.

share|improve this question
1  
C# is (generally) a statically typed language. If you're constantly looking for workarounds for that, you should probably look into an entirely dynamically typed language which has a better feature set for what you're trying to achieve. Not saying it can't be done, but it probably won't end up being "good C#". –  Joachim Isaksson Feb 10 '12 at 13:36
    
I don't have a problem with C#, or either way of handling variable input. I am asking because I am confused whether such a thing is possible in C#. –  Superbest Feb 10 '12 at 13:40
1  
The way you've done it with overloads is the standard means of doing this, i.e. where, for all practical purposes, methods do the same thing. –  Grant Thomas Feb 10 '12 at 13:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could use a parameter array params keyword to pass in an object array.

e.g.:

public Vector2 GetVectorToTile(params object[] args)

Then you can check how many is in your array and process accordingly.

But surely strongly typed parameters are better?

share|improve this answer
    
+1 as this would solve the problem although it isn't restricted to either A OR B but now to any amount of anything and now has introduced more problems in that anything can get passed in now and you have to code your function to deal with many different types. –  Sam Holder Feb 10 '12 at 13:40
    
What if someone calls GetVectorToTile("this is a string haha") ? –  n8wrl Feb 10 '12 at 13:41
    
Thanks, this was another thing I wanted to learn, although it is not very useful in this particular case- as n8wrl said, I'm not sure if type checking will still be helpful with this method (nothing stopping me from manually checking the type of those objects and throwing an exception if it's not int or Point, of course). Moreover, "someone" will not call that, as I'm the only person using this code, and I have no reason to pass a string as a coordinate. (I understand this doesn't negate your concern, n8wrl) –  Superbest Feb 10 '12 at 13:44
1  
I do not intend to sound snarky @Superbest, but "I'm the only person using this code" is only true until it is not. Assume it will outlive you. –  n8wrl Feb 10 '12 at 13:49
1  
It's a pay-off. There's no major reason why you MUST have type-safe arguments, as long as you are prepared to code for them adequately. A minor reason though is that it helps other people using your code, but you say this isn't a problem, so why not? I wouldn't do it though. –  bukko Feb 10 '12 at 14:55

I don't want to seem flippant but:

So my question is, how can I tell the method to accept "EITHER two integers OR a single point", and then convert the latter into the former before computing a result?

like this:

public Vector2 GetVectorToTile(int x, int y)
{
    return new Vector2(x * TileWidth, y * TileHeight);
}
public Vector2 GetVectorToTile(Point start)
{
    return GetVectorToTile(start.X, start.Y);
}

isn't the code you posted doing exactly what you want? and in a much cleaner more typesafe way than in the matlab example you posted.. (IMHO)

share|improve this answer
    
This IS the way to go. Playing games with params and other fake-late-bindy-tricks just un-does all the strong-typing and intellisense C# and the IDE offers you. –  n8wrl Feb 10 '12 at 13:40
    
No, that's not flippant at all. As I said though, I would like to know if something like the Matlab example is possible in C#. –  Superbest Feb 10 '12 at 13:41
    
you could just accept object in the method and then parse the type of the object to do what you want. This is more equivalent of the matlab solution, as in c# everything is an object (insert caveats here) in a similar way to everything is a matrix in matlab –  Sam Holder Feb 10 '12 at 13:43
    
+1. The clean way in a language like C# is o have two methods with the parameters you support; trying to do it another way is begging for trouble and ugly code. –  Carl Manaster Feb 10 '12 at 14:47

you could:

public Vector2 GetVectorToTile(int? x = null, int? y = null, Point? start = null)  
{
    Vector2 vector = null;
    if (x.HasValue && y.HasValue)
    {
        vector = new Vector2(x * TileWidth, y * TileHeight);         
    }
    else if(start.HasValue)
    {
        vector = new Vector2(start.X * TileWidth, start.Y * TileHeight); 
    }

    return vector;
}

But agree with Sam Holder, I think what you're doing is fine in C#. The above looks messy and probably more prone to bugs than your approach. E.g., what if you provided all 3 arguments, which would take precedence? etc.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for a nice alternative –  Sam Holder Feb 10 '12 at 14:04

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