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I have a union and enum, for eg:

typedef union{
    Home   HomeInfo;        
    Office OfficeInfo;          
} Info;

typedef enum{                               
    eHOME,  
    eOFFICE

} InfoType;

Home and Office are other structures.

I have another function whose prototype is

void SetInfo(InfoType, Info);

During function call, if InfoType is eHOME, I would create a object of Info, Info info; and fill HomeInfo details info.HomeInfo and call

SetInfo(eHONE, info);

SetInfo definition:

SetInfo(InfoType infotype, Info info)
{
    if (eHOME == infotype)
    {
        // get the details from info.HomeInfo structure
         }
         else if(eOFFICE == infotype)
         {
            // get the details from info.OffiiceInfo structure
         }
}

How can I get an invalid case if I pass eHOME as Infotype and passing the details of OfficeInfo? While I used to get the details of HomeInfo at this time, there are junk values in it, so error is not getting. Is it possible to check what the structure is after InfoType checking?

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I read your question about three times, and I still cannot understand it... can you create a self contained simple example with expected output for some input to highlight the problem? –  Nim Feb 10 '12 at 14:05
1  
Are you using C or C++? –  Ed Heal Feb 10 '12 at 15:04

4 Answers 4

void SetInfo(InfoType a, Info b);

Maybe you can cast &b to a Home*, then hardcode the first "class variable" of both Home and Office to a char that you can detect and initialize with specific values for easy detection.

Does this make any sense,,,...

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In this case, you should ensure that Info and InfoType are consistent in every call of SetInfo.

If you intended call SetInfo with inconsistent Info and InfoType, for example:

InfoType type = eHOME;
Info info;
info.OfficeInfo.xxx = xxx;
SetInfo(type, info);

Basically, as a union, you cannot distinguish whether info is an OfficeInfo or a HomeInfo, without further information of the 2 types.

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This kind of checking is possible. info is not intrinsically Home or Office. It is a block of bytes, which you can choose to interpret as either one, because it is a union.

This does not seem like a good use for a union at all. Instead Office and Home should inherit from a common parent, say Info. Then SetInfo should take a reference to Info, like this:

void SetInfo(Info &myInfo);

And you would need some factory method that knows whether it needs to pass in an instance of Home or Office.

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I am not sure what you are trying to achieve here, but this approach is almost for sure wrong. I suggest using inheritation here:

enum InfoType
{
    eHome,
    eOffice,
};

class Info
{
public:
    InfoType type() const { return type_; }

protected:
    Info(InfoType t) : type_(t) {}

private:
    InfoType type_;
};

class HomeInfo : public Info
{
public:
    HomeInfo() : Info(eHome) {}
};

class OfficeInfo : public Info
{
public:
    OfficeInfo() : Info(eOffice) {}
};

Now SetInfo function is as easy as:

void SetInfo(Info* info)
{
    if (info->type() == eHome)
    {
        HomeInfo* hi = (HomeInfo*)info;
        // ...
    }
    else if (info->type() == eOffice)
    {
        OfficeInfo* oi = (OfficeInfo*)info;
        // ...
    }
}
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